Economics 310 Bennington: Finding Academic and Trade Resources

Finding Academic Articles, Trade Publications, and Magazines

Find Articles by Subject: Business + Economics is a list of most useful library databases to find academic journal articles, trade journal articles, company profiles and industry information.

Librarian tip: Use EconLit.

OneSearch on the library homepage can be a powerful if you know how to narrow the many search results you will retrieve. Take a look at the OneSearch FAQ's to learn more.

Scholarly Journals (Peer-reviewed/Referreed)

Image of American Journal of Philology
  • Authors are authorities in their fields.
  • Authors cite their sources in endnotes, footnotes, or bibliographies.
  • Individual issues have little or no advertising.
  • Articles must go through a peer-review or refereed process.
  • Articles are usually reports on scholarly research.
  • Illustrations usually take the form of charts and graphs.
  • Articles use jargon of the discipline.

Trade Publications

Image of Trade Publications

  • Authors are specialists in a certain field or industry.
  • Authors often mention sources, but rarely formally cite them in bibliographies.
  • Intended audience includes people in the industry or people seeking employment in the industry.
  • There is no peer-review process.
  • Articles give practical information to people in an industry.
  • Some illustrations are included, usually charts, graphs, etc.
  • Authors use jargon of the industry.

Search Tips


Boolean Searches

  • AND: searches for all of the search terms.  Using *and* in between search terms will narrow your search.  For example
    • women and prohibition  
  • OR: searches for at least one of the search terms.  Using *or* in between search terms will broaden your search. For example: 
    • women or female 
    • prohibition or temperance 
  • NOT: excludes the search term immediately after the NOT operator.  Therefore, use "not" in front of a term to ensure that the search will not include that term. For example: 
    • alcohol not drugs 
  • Phrase searches
    • Please quotation marks (“ “) around the words that you want to be search together as a phrase. For example:
      • "Eighteenth Amendment" 
      • "Women's Christian Temperance Movement" 
  • Wildcard searches
    • The use of the asterisk (*) is a wildcard that most databases all you to use to search a root word and variable endings to broaden search results.  For example: 
      • latin* (retrieves "latin," "latins," "latino," "latinos," "latina," "latinas")

Types of Resources

Primary Sources

Primary sources are original materials on which other research is based. It includes documents such as poems, diaries, court records, interviews, surveys, fieldwork, and some newspaper articles. It also includes research results generated by experiments, which are published as journal articles in some fields of study.

They are also sets of data, such as census statistics, which have been tabulated, but not interpreted.

Secondary Sources

Secondary sources describe or analyze the primary sources.

Examples of secondary sources include: dictionaries, encyclopedias, textbooks, and books and articles that interpret or review research works.

Tertiary Sources

Examples of tertiary sources includes indexes and abstracts which serve to locate secondary and primary sources. An index will provide a citation which fully identifies the work: author, title of article, title of journal or book, publisher and date of publication, For a journal it will include the volume, issue and pagination. An abstract is a summary of the work being cited. Many indexes and abstract are available now online.

Subject Area Primary Source Secondary Source Tertiary Source
Art Original artwork Article critiquing the piece of art Art Index
History Slave diary Book about the Underground Railroad American: History and Life
Literature Poem Book on a particular genre of poetry MLA
Computer Science Original research published as a journal article Introductory textbook on programming Computer Database
Sociology Indian Education Act of 1972 Journal article on Native American education ERIC


Keywords vs Subject Searching

keyword cloud


  • Your topic itself may prove to be the words that may up your search term(s). 
  • Keywords searches look for that search term(s) in the title, subject, author, summary or abstract fields.
  • Keywords will also be searched for repetition in the document.  Keywords found frequently or throughout an article may push that article higher in the search results.
  • Keywords matches to dot distinguish between context and purpose.  It may match the correct word but not in the 

Subject Searching 

  • A subject search will locate materials by Library of Congress Subject Headings, which is a controlled vocabulary or standard list of subject terms. The Oviatt Library assigns Library of Congress Subject Headings to all items listed in the online catalog.
  • The number of results may vary widely.  Some searches will retrieve hundreds of results but if you choose a nonexistent subject term while others get nothing.  
  • If you do not know the appropriate subject heading for your topic, conduct a keyword search first and look at the subject heading(s) for relevant items.  

For more information visit the Keyword vs. Subject guide.