Philosophy Library Guide and Resources: Finding Sources

Library Catalog Basic Search

Catalog Search Box

Starting from the Library Catalog Basic Search screen you can search by KeywordTitleAuthor, or Subject by selecting the radio buttons and typing search words in the text box.

The default Limits setting will search the entire collection. You may also limit your search to smaller sub-collections: Ejournals (electronic periodicals--not specific articles), Ebooks, NCOD (National Center on Deafness), TCC (Teacher Curriculum Center), Periodicals/Serials (not specific articles), Videos, Reference Room, Special Collections, or Sound Recordings by selecting a collection from the drop-down menu.

Searching for a specific Item

Select an Author or Title search if you know the author (last name, first name) or at least the first few words of the title.

Searching for Items by Topic

There are two ways to search the online catalog for resources on a topic: by Keyword or by Subject.

  • Basic Keyword search will simultaneously look for words in titles of materials, in subject headings, and in notes fields.
  • Subject search will locate materials by Library of Congress Subject Headings, which is a controlled vocabulary or standard list of subject terms. The Oviatt Library assigns Library of Congress Subject Headings to all items listed in the online catalog.
  • Another way to find the Library of Congress Subject Heading for your topic is to search the catalog by Keyword, display the record for a relevant title, and select one or more of the Subjects listed for that record.

Finding Articles in Magazines, Journals, and Newspapers

Pick a database recommended for your subject from Databases by Subject and then search using keywords.

To locate the full text of an article:

  • If full-text is available in the database, click on the link to full text (HTML or PDF).
  • If full-text isn't available in the database, click the Find Text button to see if we have access to the article in another database or in print in the library
  • If no Find Text button is available or you didn't find the article through our databases, search for the magazine or journal title using the Journals tab in the library catalog.
  • If the full text isn't available through the Library, you can request an Interlibrary Loan for the article(s) that you need. However, you must allow about two weeks for this!

 

Types of Periodicals

Different types of publications have different purposes and different audiences. When we talk about journals/magazines, we can usually divide these publications into three broad categories: scholarly journals, popular magazines, and trade publications.

Check Ulrich's to see if a journal is peer-reviewed/referreed

Scholarly Journals Trade Publications Popular Magazines Newpapers
Current Psychology Research and Reviews Information Today Psychology Today New York Times
Geographical Perspectives Aviation Week and Space Technology Discover USA Today

Library Catalog Advanced Search

For an Advanced search, select the Advanced Catalog Search link on the homepage. The Advanced search allows you to search by keyword in up to four separate fields, and optionally limit your search by language, material type, location, collection, publisher, or publication date.

To start your search:

  1. Select the field you want to search (Author, Title, Subject, Note, or "any field") from the first drop-down menu.
  2. Type keyword(s) in the adjacent text box. Two or more words entered together in one search box will retrieve records containing that exact phrase, unless there is no exact match. If there is no exact match for the phrase entered, the system will retrieve records contain all search terms entered, wherever they are in the record.
  3. (OPTIONAL) For a combined search, enter additional keywords into separate search boxes and choose the appropriate Boolean operators (and, or, and not) from the pull-down menu.

Choose the Right Resource

When choosing resources for your assignment, consider:

  • Assignment requirements—what does the professor want you to cite?
  • Learn about your topic -- You may want to use a reference book like an encyclopedia (print or online) to start out with if you don't have a clear understanding of your topic yet.
  • Time—the more current the topic, the less will be found in scholarly journals or books, which take longer to get published. Recent events will be covered on the Internet, in newspapers and magazines, as well as in the media.
  • Depth of coverage and/or the topic—scholarly journals and books cover topics in more depth than magazines and newspapers. Some topics are not covered by the popular press, e.g., research that would not be of interest to the average consumer.
  • Quality of the resource - see Step 3: Evaluating Sources
Type of Information You Need Try These Resources
Does your topic cover current events? Newspapers, magazines, Internet
Do you need general information on a specific topic, written in a non-specialist style?
Newspapers, magazines, Internet
Do you need in-depth information on a specific topic, written for the college student and above by authorities in the field? Scholarly journals
Do you need more detail and/or has the topic been written about for awhile? Books
Do you need an overview, quick facts, statistics on a topic? Reference books, Internet

Finding Online Reference Books

View a complete list of Electronic Encyclopedias in the Oviatt Library Catalog

To limit the list by subject or title:

  1. Click the Modify Search button.
  2. In the Keyword Search screen, type subject or title words in the second search box (under "encyclopedias").
  3. Click the Submit Search button. (Note: once you've modified the search, it will list both online and print encyclopedias. You can recognize an online encyclopedia by the [electronic resource] tag after the title.)

Search Credo Reference for online reference sources:

Finding Print Reference Books

You find print reference books using the library catalog.

Enter your search terms:

  • To find a specific book, enter the title in the Search For box and select "Title" as the type of search.
  • To find a book on a particluar topic, like sociology, enter the topic in the search box and select "Keyword" as the type of search.

Next, choose "Reference Room" from the "Limit to" drop down box. Then select the "Submit Search" button.

From the list of results that appears, click on the book's title to see more about it. To help you find the book, note the location and the call number.

Note: If "Stored" is the location, it's in the ASRS. Click the "Request" button to get it. The book will be at the Circulation Desk on the first floor in about 10-15 minutes.

Reference books cannot be checked out (there are exceptions for Faculty and Staff), but you can copy the pages you need using the photocopy machines located throughout the Library.

Finding Websites on Specific Topics

  • Browse Web sites identified by librarians in Research Guides for specific subjects (see Databases by Subject).
  • Search using keywords in an Internet search engine, such as Google. Try Search Engine Watch to find other Internet search engines.