RTM 510 Trends and Issues in Hospitality and Tourism

Professor Joong-Won Lee

Topics: Culinary tourism, social media, generation Y in Hospitality (social demographics), destination Image, mandatory vs service gratuity (compensation)effect on employee performance, uncontrolled transportation in Yosemite, theme park purchasing membership fee (loyalty), effects of technology on tourism, event tourism (e.g. wedding)

 

 

The Goals of today's library session are:

Finding Articles in Magazines, Journals, and Newspapers

Pick a database recommended for your subject from Databases by Subject and then search using keywords.

To locate the full text of an article:

  • If full-text is available in the database, click on the link to full text (HTML or PDF).
  • If full-text isn't available in the database, click the Find Text button to see if we have access to the article in another database or in print in the library
  • If no Find Text button is available or you didn't find the article through our databases, search for the magazine or journal title using the Journals tab in the library catalog.
  • If the full text isn't available through the Library, you can request an Interlibrary Loan for the article(s) that you need. However, you must allow about two weeks for this!

 

How to Cite Articles

  • Determine which citation style to use; the two most commonly used at CSUN are MLA and APA. If your professor didn't specify, pick one and use it consistently.
  • Check the sample style sheets (MLA or APA) to see what information the article citation should contain and how it should be formatted.
  • Be sure to indicate where material you quoted directly or paraphrased came from.

For more information, see Citing Your Sources - Plagiarism.

Citation Formatting Tools

Library Catalog Basic Search

Catalog Search Box

Starting from the Library Catalog Basic Search screen you can search by KeywordTitleAuthor, or Subject by selecting the radio buttons and typing search words in the text box.

The default Limits setting will search the entire collection. You may also limit your search to smaller sub-collections: Ejournals (electronic periodicals--not specific articles), Ebooks, NCOD (National Center on Deafness), TCC (Teacher Curriculum Center), Periodicals/Serials (not specific articles), Videos, Reference Room, Special Collections, or Sound Recordings by selecting a collection from the drop-down menu.

Searching for a specific Item

Select an Author or Title search if you know the author (last name, first name) or at least the first few words of the title.

Searching for Items by Topic

There are two ways to search the online catalog for resources on a topic: by Keyword or by Subject.

  • Basic Keyword search will simultaneously look for words in titles of materials, in subject headings, and in notes fields.
  • Subject search will locate materials by Library of Congress Subject Headings, which is a controlled vocabulary or standard list of subject terms. The Oviatt Library assigns Library of Congress Subject Headings to all items listed in the online catalog.
  • Another way to find the Library of Congress Subject Heading for your topic is to search the catalog by Keyword, display the record for a relevant title, and select one or more of the Subjects listed for that record.

Scholarly Journals (Peer-reviewed/Referreed)

Image of American Journal of Philology
  • Authors are authorities in their fields.
  • Authors cite their sources in endnotes, footnotes, or bibliographies.
  • Individual issues have little or no advertising.
  • Articles must go through a peer-review or refereed process.
  • Articles are usually reports on scholarly research.
  • Illustrations usually take the form of charts and graphs.
  • Articles use jargon of the discipline.

OneSearch

OneSearch allows you to search, at this time,  150 databases as well as the Oviatt Library catalog.   Although 150 databases, many indexes (e.g. PubMed, PsycInfo, Physical Education Index, LLBA...), full text databases (e.g. ScienceDirect, Sage Journals, JSTOR, Springer, Taylor & Franics...) are a lot of databases, OneSearch does NOT contain the contents of all our databses yet.  OneSearch does offer a consistent way to save the records you want to keep, and if you view your saved records, on the right there is a "Export to EndNoteWeb" command where you can easily send the bibliographic information on the source you are viewing into your personal (editable) citation management database. 

OneSearch is very useful to look up scholarly article citations (use quick keyword search author surname key words in title, or type in the article Doi if your citation offers a Doi), or do a simple keyword search on topic.   You can identify academic articles easily, often be advised article is "peer reviewed" and see lots of hints on other keywords you can use for your search strategy.

Visit the OneSearch FAQ to learn all about how to use the library's new online OneSearch tool to find articles, books and more. Or, watch the How to Use OneSearch video: