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Comp 100: Overview

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Evaluating Sources with CRAAP

A young girl looking down at a dog with the caption "Is that CRAAP?"

Currency - When was it published?  For websites, when was the last revision? Does your topic require the most current information?

Relevancy - How well does it relate to your topic? Who is the intended audience? Does this satisfy your information need?

Authority - Who is the author? What are the author's credentials or affiliations? Are they qualified to write on this topic?

Accuracy - Where does the information come from? Is the information supported by evidence? Does the author cite their sources?

Purpose - Is the purpose to inform, sell, entertain or persuade the reader? Is the information fact, opinion or propaganda? Can you identify any bias?

Evaluating Websites

Search Tips

 

Boolean Searches

  • AND: searches for all of the search terms.  Using *and* in between search terms will narrow your search.  For example
    • women and prohibition  
  • OR: searches for at least one of the search terms.  Using *or* in between search terms will broaden your search. For example: 
    • women or female 
    • prohibition or temperance 
  • NOT: excludes the search term immediately after the NOT operator.  Therefore, use "not" in front of a term to ensure that the search will not include that term. For example: 
    • alcohol not drugs 
  • Phrase searches
    • Please quotation marks (“ “) around the words that you want to be search together as a phrase. For example:
      • "Eighteenth Amendment" 
      • "Women's Christian Temperance Movement" 
  • Wildcard searches
    • The use of the asterisk (*) is a wildcard that most databases all you to use to search a root word and variable endings to broaden search results.  For example: 
      • latin* (retrieves "latin," "latins," "latino," "latinos," "latina," "latinas")