Monthly Archives: November 2012

Watch Stage Performance Videos with Two New Databases

Theatre on Video

The Critic, by Richard Brinsley Sheridan, directed by Don Taylor, performed by Sir John Gielgud, Nigel Hawthorne & Rosemary Leach

‘Talking about music is like dancing about architecture’ may be one of the most common adages acknowledging the value of experiencing art for interpretation. For many, witnessing a performance is key to seeing how everything fits together. While reading a play is one level of understanding a work, this may not be enough to support mastery of the craft. But seeing a piece unfold can be instrumental in discovering its multiple layers and sometimes this requires viewing many different performances of the same work. Two of the Oviatt Library’s latest resources, which have been funded by the Campus Quality Fee, make experiencing Opera and Theatre performances much more accessible. Students, staff and faculty can now log in to Library resources through Databases A-Z to find them. While some performances may be found on YouTube, the quality of the videos in these databases is generally higher and includes permission to cite them as academic sources. In addition to viewing the performances directly from the databases, these videos can also be shared with classes through Moodle. So put your dancing shoes aside as the adage suggests and enjoy the convenience of Opera and Theatre performances directly from your computer. 

Opera in Video - Collection of the most important opera performances, captured on video through staged productions, interviews, and documentaries. Selections represent the world’s best performers, conductors, and opera houses and are based on a work’s importance to the operatic canon.

 Theatre in Video - Collection of more than 250 definitive performances of the world’s leading plays, together with more than 100 film documentaries, online in streaming video, representing hundreds of leading playwrights, actors and directors.

- Coleen Martin and Lindsay Hansen

Spend Some Time this Thanksgiving with Oviatt Resources

Thanksgiving

Faith Goble 2010

Happy Thanksgiving, Matadors! The Oviatt Library will be closed this Thursday and Friday in honor of the holiday, so check out some books and movies to enjoy over the long weekend. If you’ll be travelling and want some distractions, browse the best sellers collection in the reference room for the latest mysteries, romance, and other fun fiction.

Thanksgiving is all about tradition.  Read about its history of the holiday in Thanksgiving: The Biography of an American Holiday (GT4975 .B33 2009) and Mayflower: A Story of Courage, Community, and War (F68 .P44 2006).  Both books are available for check out on the second floor.

For the traditional feast, try the ebook Take Control of Thanksgiving Dinner. It has all the basic recipes plus vegetarian alternatives, and solutions to last minute crises. Great for first-time chefs.

 If you’re dreading the big family gathering, watch Ang Lee’s film The Ice Storm (PN1997 .I347 2008 in the Music & Media library).  The all-star cast’s depiction of family dissolution during Thanksgiving 1973 might resonate.

 We’ll reopen at 11AM on Saturday.  Enjoy the break!

 – Laura Wimberley

Research Therapy: Citing Your Sources

The sixth installment of Research Therapy gives you a brief overview of why you need to cite, when you should cite and how you should cite.

Do you have a research paper or project coming up and your instructor wants a specific number of sources? Knowing when and how to cite your sources can be a little confusing. The most important thing that you need to know is that you need to cite anything you use that doesn’t originate from you. Not only should you do this when you’re writing a paper or working on a research project, but also when creating a presentation or a website. You should cite tweets, blog posts, images, podcasts, and YouTube videos, basically anything you use that you did not create yourself.

citing image

Citation Styles
Different academic disciplines have different citation styles, it’s important that you know what style your instructor wants you to use. Here’s some examples of the different styles.

citation chart

Citing Special Resources?
Here’s a list of resources and guides for citing less common sources.
Government Documents
Business Resources : a comprehensive guide from Harvard Business School on citing various types of sources, including reports, interviews, and legal cases (just to name a few).
• This guide from Boise State gives examples of citing images, Twitter, Facebook, blog posts, maps, and videos.

Need More Help?
For additional help on creating citations using various styles check out Oviatt Library’s Citing Your Sources guide. For a quick how-to on creating an annotated bibliography, check out session three of the Research Therapy video series.
Still confused, about plagiarism? Check out this online tutorial created by UCLA students.

-Laurie Borchard

laurie.borchard@csun.edu

Please tell us what you think about our Research Therapy videos at our survey. Thank you.

The Teacher Curriculum Center: The Best Kept Secret – and It’s Not Just for Teachers!

Teacher Curriculum Center (TCC)Come to the Teacher Curriculum Center (TCC)! While the department’s name may sound intellectual and stuffy, it is actually a friendly place- and space –for all students to research, study, and create. It is an open work area for aspiring teachers, future business bigwigs, or perhaps a mechanical engineer.

Among its many offerings, the TCC houses materials for those working with children, grades K-12. Its collection includes a variety of items: instructional kits, games, CDs. DVDs, puppets and lesson plans. It also features a collection of over 5,000 children’s and young adult books. If you are looking for Rainbow Fish, Hop on Pop, Harry Potter, or The Hunger Games, they are all available for check out.

But wait, there is more! Many are not aware that the TCC is a fantastic multi-use area that allows for individual or group study, bulletin board construction, and poster presentation creation. It has a die-cut machine which can be used to cut out letters, numbers, animals, and geometric shapes to add spark to your artistic designs. The three large white boards can be used for a wide variety of purposes: working out mathematical formulas or diagramming flowcharts. Students needing to practice the dance steps for their Children’s Music class can do so in the TCC. Need to rehearse your speech for your public speaking course? The TCC is the place for you.

The TCC is located on the Garden Level of the Oviatt library (enter through the library’s main entrance). Come and check it out!

- Mara Houdyshell