Category: Research Therapy

How to Read Citations

Have you ever stared at a citation and had no idea if it was a book, chapter in a book, article or website? This infographic in our Research Therapy series breaks down citations for you, highlighting the various elements that make up a citation.

How to read a citation

Book Citations 

Elements of a book citation: author, title of book, publisher information, year. and format.

Elements of a chapter in a book citation: author of chapter, title of chapter, title of book, editor of book, publisher information, and page range of chapters.

Book Clues:

  • If the citation has publisher name and location, it’s a book!
  • In MLA citation style the format means the medium of publication.
  • E-books may have a URL, database name, or date of access at the end of the citation.

Article Citations

Elements of magazine and journal article citations: author, title of article, title of publication, volume number, issue number, year of publication, and page numbers.

Elements of a newspaper article: author, title of article, title of publication, date of publication, page number or section.

For articles found in an online library database the only difference in the citation is the addition at the end of the citation of the following; name of the database, format, access date, and sometimes the URL or DOI.

Article Clue:

  • All published articles will have two titles; the title of the article and the title of the journal/magazine/newspaper.
  • In MLA the format for an article in a library database will say “web”, but it’s not a website.
  • Magazines may just have a month of publication instead of a volume and issue number.
  • Depending on the citations style, you may see a URL or DOI for an article in an online database.

Website Citations

The elements of a website citation usually include: author/editor, title of work or page, name of the website, publisher or sponsor of website, title URL, date of publication, format, and access date.

Website Clues:

  • Websites may not provide publication dates.
  • Websites don’t always have authors, they may just list the organization that created the website.
  • Depending on the citation style, you may see the term “retrieved from” followed by a URL.

Things to Remember

  • Every citation style is different, but the elements of what makes up a citation are the same.
  • If you’re unsure of what type of article it is, just Google the name of the publication
  • You can always ask a librarian for help!

– Laurie Borchard

Reference Resources

Have you seen or heard the word reference in the library or online and wondered what that meant exactly? Check out our newest edition of Research Therapy and learn about all the different types of reference.

What is Reference?

What is Reference?

Reference Books

  • Dictionaries
  • Encyclopedias
  • Bibliographies
  • Almanacs
  • Handbooks & Manuals

Where can you find reference resources?

  • Print: Learning Commons, 1st Floor
  • Online: From the library’s homepage, click on “Databases by Subject” then click on “Reference Sources” or look for e-books in the Library Catalog

Why use a reference source?

  • Brief & introductory information on a topic
  • Good for background information and overview of topics
  • Use for facts and figures

Pro-Tip

  • More reliable than Wikipedia
  • If the book spine says REF or Learning Commons, it can’t be checked out!

Reference Desk

What is it?

  • Have a question? Librarians are waiting to talk to you. No appointment necessary!

Where is it located?

  • Learning Commons, 1st Floor, look for the wall that says: “Reference – Ask A Librarian”

Why use this service?

  • Research help
  • Develop research strategies
  • Ask questions
  • Find books and articles

Online help at library.csun.edu/AskUs via Email, Chat & Text

Reference Page

What is it?

  • Citations of the resources referred to in a paper, article, report, or book

Where is it located?

  • Found at the end of an article, chapter, or book.
  • Include References (APA) or a Works Cited (MLA) page at the end of your own papers!

Why should you create it?

  • Give credit where credit is due!

Pro-Tip: If you find an interesting article or book and want to research the topic further, look up one of the citations!

-Isabelle Ramos and Nina Mamikunian

 

 

 

Find Out About Magazines and Journals!

Magazine vs Journal

Magazines vs. Journals

 Popular Sources = magazines and newspaper articles

  • Purpose: Inform and entertain the general reader
  • Authors: journalist or professional writers (usually employees of the publication)
  • Audience: general public
  • Coverage: Broad variety of public interest topics, cross disciplinary.
  • Publisher: Commercial
  • Characteristics:
    • Few or no cited references
    • General summaries of background information
    • Contain advertisements
    • Length of articles are usually brief, 1-5 pages
  • Frequency: Published on a daily, weekly, or monthly basis.
  • Examples: Time, Newsweek, Vogue, National Geographic, The New Yorker

 Scholarly Sources = journal articles

  • Purpose: To communicate research and scholarly ideas
  • Authors: researchers, scholars, or faculty (usually listed with their institution affiliation)
  • Audience: other scholars, students
  • Coverage: Very narrow and specific topics
  • Publisher: Professional associations, academic institutions, and many commercial publishers.
  • Characteristics:
    • Includes full citations for sources
    • Uses scholarly or technical language
    • Peer reviewed
    • Length of articles are longer, over 5 pages
  • Frequency: Published on a monthly, quarterly, or annual basis
  • Examples: Journal of Politics, Sociological Review, Journal of Marriage and Family

 Things to keep in mind:

  • You can find both types of sources using the Oviatt Library’s Databases.
  • Book reviews and editorials found in journals are not considered scholarly articles.
  • Both magazines and journal articles can be good sources for your work.
  • Often a combination of the two will be the most appropriate for undergraduate research.

– Jamie Johnson

Research Therapy: Controversial Topics

Welcome back to another session of Research Therapy. This session is all about researching controversial topics.

Are vaccines safe enough? Should there be more gun control? Does government surveillance conflict with privacy?

As a student, you might be assigned a writing prompt in which you are asked to write about a controversial issue, or a “hot” topic. Once you have chosen a topic, this type of assignment requires you to include outside knowledge in addition to your own interpretation and opinion. Knowledge about your chosen topic can be found almost everywhere, but remember the different types of sources: books, newspapers or magazines, and public information on the Internet. In this tutorial, we introduce three academic databases that can help you find reliable sources for a writing assignment on a controversial issue.

Why does this matter?

As a consumer of information, it serves you to be well aware from where you’re obtaining your news—that is, what sources are you accessing to feed you information. A “hot” topic is controversial because the issue must be socially complicated, must have more than one point of view, and probably stirs debates among people with opposing opinions. Due to the controversy, the media and sources that report on the current events of a social issue have difficulty reporting information that is completely objective—that is, without a subtle bias, political beliefs, or commercial interests. Since it’s almost unrealistic for journalism and the media to report information without some degree of media bias, you should think and reflect about how accurate and fair the sources are presenting you with news. If we measure the objectivity of the source by how accurate and fair that source presents information, then we can learn about the many sides of an issue and its opposing points of view.

How do we distinguish between objective and unreliable sources?

Just because a news source is opinionated or espouses a possible agenda—like a political leaning or corporate backing—that does not mean it is unreliable. But sources that show multiple views and allow rebuttals to their own stated opinions are more likely to provide a well-rounded examination of current events and social issues. As a researcher, you should try to find those type of sources—so that even if you’re writing about your interpretation of an issue, your viewpoint will present opinions that are well supported and aware of all the other points of view.

Links to databases featured in videos:

Opposing Viewpoints in Context
Gale Virtual Reference Library
CQ Researcher

 -Mario Macias

Research Therapy: Digital Library Resources

If I got a nickel every time a student asks me at the reference desk for a “book or article” on their topic, I would have a lot of cents. But the warm, happy feeling I get when I show a student a useful resource he or she didn’t know we had is priceless.

Library databases contain so much more than scholarly articles that you can use to complement your research or for building your own knowledge: documentaries, speeches, streaming music, photography, decades-old newspapers, your professors’ professional work, the list goes on and on.

This session of Research Therapy will introduce you to just a few of the databases that contain resources that you may not think about when you think “research”:

In addition to the databases in the video, here is a list of other resources (free websites and library databases) you can use to build your Digital Library:

Digital Library Resources
Name Images Video eBooks Audio Ephemera
Internet Archive X X X X X
ScholarWorks X X X X X
Project Gutenberg X X X X
American Memory Project X X X X
Berg Fashion Library X X X
NBC Learn in Higher Ed X X X
Calisphere X X
Oviatt Library Digital Collections X X
Biography Index Past and Present X X
Great Speeches Video Series X
Films on Demand X
Theatre in Video X
Environmental Studies in Video X
LGBT Studies in Video X
Naxos Music Library X
Ebrary Academic Complete X
Safari Tech Books Online X
eBook Collection X

Wayback Machine

You know how websites change all the time? If only there was a way to see what the page looked like five years ago…

THERE IS!

The WayBack Machine on the Internet Archive has been capturing websites since the nineties. And these aren’t just screenshots, many of the links still work so you can click around like it’s 1999.

Wayback Machine screenshot

ScholarWorks

Did you just take a class that blew your mind and want to learn more from your professor?
Do you want to see what academic research looks like?
Are you considering grad school and want to know what a thesis looks like?

Check out ScholarWorks, CSUN’s institutional repository, where you can search by type of work, author, and department:

ScholarWorks screenshot

 

Need help building and organizing your digital bookshelf? Take a look at the Research Therapy session on Using Reference Managers to learn more about organizing your digital library.

And remember, you can Ask A Librarian about much more than books and articles. Let us know if you need help!

– Anna Fidgeon

Research Therapy: Let the Library Help during Finals Week

Finals Are You Stressed ComicHow the Library Can Help ComicThere’s no need to worry, the Oviatt Library can help! The Oviatt is open extended hours beginning December 4 to help you prepare for Finals week. We know that none of you would wait until the last minute to do your research, but just in case you did and you’re struggling, you can get help from a Librarian 24/7. Come see a librarian at the reference desk in the Learning Commons. During finals week from Monday to Thursday there will be a librarian at the desk from 8am to 9pm, Friday from 8am to 4:45pm, Saturday from 12pm to 4:45pm and on Sunday from 12pm to 5pm. You can also contact us online, via chat or email as well as text messaging, check out our Ask a Librarian page. You can also get help online with our subject and course guides, including a guide for Citing Your Sources.

The Learning Resource Center is located on the 3rd floor of the library in the East wing; they offer tutoring, help with paper writing and citations. Check out their webpage for more information and hours. You’ll want to make sure to call ASAP to make an appointment.

If you just need a place to study, don’t forget that you can reserve group and individual study rooms in the library. You can reserve these rooms in advance online, using our online booking system.

In case you need a break we have special events happening during Finals week. We’ll be handing out pillows all week along with special events like: arts & crafts, board games, a graffiti board and therapy dogs. Check out the flyer for dates and times of these events.

For more suggestions on how to de-stress, check out our Pinterest page for tips on relaxation, motivational memes and cute photos of animals.

Just remember to keep calm and carry on and if you can’t do that, then scream, dance, or shake it out!!! http://youtu.be/WbN0nX61rIs

-Laurie Borchard

Research Therapy: Finding Images Online

finding images infographicUsing images can greatly enhance your research paper, poster, or presentation.  However it can be confusing to know exactly where to find images and if you need permission to legally use it.

Please note that the use of images found in print or online may be protected by copyright. Some require permission under certain circumstances, and some may even cost a fee. To be safe always attribute the source of the image.

A great starting point to learn more about this topic is the Finding and Using Images guide. It has been created for the purpose of helping you find and use images for educational purposes. Here you will find information to understand resources available to help find images using websites and library databases, copyright information, and how to cite images in MLA and APA format:

Watch this video to learn more about Creative Commons licenses and where/how to search for these types of images within search engines such as Google Image, Flickr, and Wikimedia Commons.  – Jamie Johnson

Research Therapy: Online Privacy in a Big Data World

It is important to think about where your information comes from and how it is presented to you as well as knowing what you can do to protect your privacy. These days it is next to impossible to function without providing some amount of personal information online. Although it might seem futile to worry about online privacy, there are ways to protect yourself by using the tools that are available to help block organizations from collecting your information and by critically thinking about the information you are being asked to give up online. This session of Research Therapy discusses who is collecting your information, ways to monitor the information about you that ends up online, and what you can do to protect your privacy.

Research Therapy video

Of course, free websites or internet browsers such as Google Chrome have to make money somehow. You might already know about cookies and other tracking devices that are used to collect your information and search habits to sell to advertisers. But your online habits shape more than the ad space on social media sites. In the Ted Talk below, Eli Pariser describes what he calls the Filter Bubble– where most of your online activity is shaped by what you have done in the past.

Filter Bubbles talk video

Even though cookies and online tracking do give you the convenience of not having to remember all your passwords, and allowing for easier use of the websites you use most often, there are times when you might want to take advantage of your privacy options. For example, if you are on a public computer such as the ones on campus. Below are some privacy tips you can use while using certain internet browsers or websites.

How to Turn on Private Browsing in Internet Browsers:

Google Chrome

Menu> New Incognito Window (or Ctrl + Shift + N)

Chrome privacy settings

Safari

Apple: Safari> Private Browsing

Safari privacy settings

PC: Settings>Private Browsing

PC privacy settings

Firefox

Menu>New Private Window (or Ctrl + Shift + P)

Firefox privacy settings

Right click on a link> Open Link in New Private Window

Right click on link

Internet Explorer

Settings> Safety> InPrivate Browsing (or Ctrl + Shift + P)

IE privacy settings

Settings>Internet Options> Privacy>Low, Medium, High

Internet options

IE privacy options

Stop Facebook From Tracking You:

Disable Facebook tracking with the free Facebook Disconnect App:

https://chrome.google.com/webstore/detail/facebook-disconnect/ejpepffjfmamnambagiibghpglaidiec

Lifehacker’s Always Up To Date Guide to Managing Your Facebook Privacy:

http://lifehacker.com/5813990/the-always-up-to-date-guide-to-managing-your-facebook-privacy

 

Check Yourself Out Online

Note: these sites may also request fees for their services.

 

pipl

 

 

https://pipl.com/

 

spokeo

 

http://www.spokeo.com/

 

webmii

 

 

http://webmii.com/

 

URLs from the video:

 Google Alerts:

https://www.google.com/alerts

Google’s Manage Your Online Reputation:

https://support.google.com/accounts/answer/1228138?hl=en

 Infographic: How Employers Use Social Media to Hire and Fire (The Atlantic):

http://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2011/08/infographic-how-employers-use-social-media-to-hire-and-fire/243599/

 Pew Research Internet Project: Reputation Management and Social Media:

http://www.pewinternet.org/2010/05/26/reputation-management-and-social-media/

 WikiHow’s Disable Cookies Tutorial:

http://www.wikihow.com/Disable-Cookies

– Anna Fidgeon

Research Therapy: Let the Library Help during Finals Week

Finals Are You Stressed ComicHow the Library Can Help ComicThere’s no need to worry, the Oviatt Library can help! The Oviatt is open 24/7 from Monday to Friday during finals week. We know that none of you would wait until the last minute to do your research, but just in case you did and you’re struggling, you can get help from a Librarian 24/7. Come see a librarian at the reference desk in the Learning Commons. During finals week from Monday to Thursday there will be a librarian at the desk from 8am to 9pm, on Friday from 8am to 4:45pm. You can also contact us online, via chat or email as well as text messaging, check out our Ask a Librarian page. You can also get help online with oour subject and course guides, including a guide for Citing Your Sources.

The Learning Resource Center is located on the 3rd floor of the library in the East wing; they offer tutoring, help with paper writing and citations. Check out their webpage for more information and be aware that their Writing Center closes Wednesday May 14th so make sure to call ASAP to make an appointment.

If you just need a place to study, don’t forget that you can reserve group and individual study rooms in the library. You can reserve these rooms in advance online, using our online booking system.

In case you need a break we have special events happening every day of Finals week. We’ll be handing out pillows all week along with special events like: arts & crafts, comedy movies, nap time and therapy dogs. Check out the flyer for dates and times of these events.

For more suggestions on how to de-stress, check out Pinterest page for tips on relaxation, motivational memes and cute photos of animals.

Just remember to keep calm and carry on and if you can’t do that, then scream, dance, or shake it out!!! http://youtu.be/WbN0nX61rIs

-Laurie Borchard

Research Therapy: How To Find Statistical Data

Do you need to back your research up with statistics? The Oviatt Library provides access to several statistical databases, as well as online guides to help you find exactly what you need. There are also a lot of resources freely available on the web.

This short video shows you how to find our collection of statistical resources, as well as how to search some of them. 

Research Therapy on Statistics

For more information, check out our Finding Statistics and Finding Statistics by Zip Code guides.

-Isabelle Ramos

Daily, Weekly, Gazette: Where to Find Hot-Off-The-Press News or Cooled Off Stories

Newspapers, newspapers everywhere and not an article for me!

Have to find a newspaper article for an assignment? Want to use a newspaper as a primary source to understand how an event was reported on when it happened? Have you used up your free New York Times articles, but still want to read the news? The Oviatt Library can help you.

This video explains three ways to access the Library’s newspaper subscriptions online: through OneSearch, the News & Current Issues databases, and through a Journal title search.

OneSearch

On a related note: you might take a look at the Research
Therapy session The Info-Cycle for more information on how news contributes to human knowledge.

– Anna Fidgeon

Research Therapy: Using Lynda.com

Research Therapy is back this semester with a special video
on the video tutorial website Lynda.com.
This incredibly valuable resource was made available to all CSUN
students, faculty, and staff through CSUN’s Campus Quality Fee.

Lynda.com image

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This website offers high quality video tutorials on the following topics:
• Web design
• Programming languages
• Business & marketing
• Education
• Photography
• Audio, video & animation production
• Adobe Creative Suite software
• Microsoft Office
• iPad tips
• and more!!

You can browse by topic or software, and even narrow your results by skill level, sub-topics, and author. To access go to http://www.csun.edu/it/lynda you will have to login using your CSUN ID and password, (the same as your portal login). This login allows you to access everything Lynda has to offer, as well create your own personal playlists and bookmark your favorites. For more information check out www.csun.edu/it/lynda

Don’t forget you can also visit the IT Help Center or the Ask a Librarian desk on the first floor of the library in our Learning Commons for help.

-Laurie Borchard

Research Therapy: Keeping Those References in Line

You’re almost there! You dominated that test, you perfected your presentation, you’ve written a gazillion pages. But, one thing looms:

works cited page

You have options! Let me introduce 5 free tools that will help you keep your citations organized as well as generate your citations for you. But remember: each of these citation tools are only meant to HELP you. If the computer makes a mistake, you’re the one getting marked down for it. Use the Oviatt Library’s Cite Your Sources page thoughtfully—for proofreading and more.

Save this record

 

http://library.csun.edu/

zotero

 

http://www.zotero.org/

mendeley

 

http://www.mendeley.com/

Endnote Basic

 

http://www.myendnoteweb.com/

EasyBib

 

http://easybib.com/

Research Therapy video screenshot

If you would like to get more acquainted with any of these tools, there are plenty of tutorials on YouTube as well as courtesy of The University of Texas Libraries.

If you’d like some human interaction to go along with your citations, just ask a librarian.

– Anna Fidgeon

 

Research Therapy: The Info-Cycle

In Session 12 of Research Therapy, we learned ways to identify different types of information. So how do you decide what information is best for you to use? Let’s take a quick (and grossly oversimplified) look at the Cycle of Information:

Of course, there are going to be outliers and other types of information that might work for you (diaries! letters! art! oh my!), but the two most important things to remember are: 1.) follow your professor’s assignment requirements and 2.) be critical: know the who, what, when, where, how, and why of your resource. Our session on Evaluating Websites can be applied to any resource.

Be sure to check out #researchRx on Twitter for a quick fix on research tips!

Good luck on those long research papers! If you need help, don’t forget you can Ask a Librarian.

– Anna Fidgeon

Research Therapy: Types of Information Sources

It’s the beginning of the semester and most of your instructors have probably given you your research assignments. Maybe it’s a presentation, or a paper or an annotated bibliography? It’s time to begin searching for sources to support your research, but before you begin your search you should have an understanding of the different types of information sources that will be most useful for your research topic. http://youtu.be/iPCte4BmWTQ Another valuable type of resource is government documents. They offer a lot of primary sources and secondary sources as well. Some examples include: • census data • congressional hearings and court transcripts • maps (current and historical) • patents, trademarks and copyrights • statistics regarding education, health, environment, transportation and more • consumer information and statistics Check out our online guides to government resources: general guide to Government Publications at the Oviatt Library and a list of all our Government Publication Subject Guides. Now that you know the different types of sources available to you, take another look at your research topic or question and decide which kind of source you need to support your research. To help you decide which sources would be best, think about the currency of your topic and the type of evidence you need to support your ideas. The following table is an example of different types of research and the appropriate sources.

Current events & trends
Newspapers, news websites, magazines
Case studies, ethnographic research, longitudinal studies
Scholarly journals & books
Statistics and legal documents
Government documents and websites
Topic overviews & definitions
Reference & books
In-depth analysis on a topic
Scholarly journals & books


– Laurie Borchard