Oviatt Celebrates American Independence


Creative Commons license 2013 by flickr user Jim St. Croix

In honor of Independence Day, check out Oviatt’s resources on America’s founding.

Book Cover of "Desperate Sons"Desperate Sons: Samuel Adams, Patrick Henry, John Hancock, and the Secret Band of Radicals who Led the Colonies to War by Les Staniford is a “a rich, exhilarating account of the circumstances behind the forming of the Sons of Liberty and how their actions in Boston, New York, Philadelphia and elsewhere brought an anti-establishment coalition to the fore of the conflict,” according to Kirkus Reviews. Oviatt Floor 2, Stack 15, call number E206 .S77 2012

Book cover of "The Glorious Cause"For a more scholarly – but still accessible – take, try The Glorious Cause: The American Revolution, 1763-1789 by Robert Middlekauff. A review in the American Historical Review calls it a “crisp and engaging recounting” of the causes and waging of the war of independence. Oviatt Floor 2, Stack 15, call number E208 .M54 2007 

Oviatt Library will be closed on July Fourth, but lots of resources are available online 24/7. The Library of Congress has a digital exhibit on Creating the Declaration of Independence, as well as many other resources on the American Revolution.

You can browse digital images of newspapers from all over America, seeing the Revolution as our forbearers did, through America’s Historical Newspapers.

Let history come alive with documentaries from Films on Demand, a streaming video service for CSUN students, faculty, and staff. Below, watch “Revolution” from the series America: The Story of Us.

Let history come alive with documentaries from Films on Demand, a streaming video service for CSUN students, faculty, and staff: watch “Revolution” from the series America: The Story of Us streaming to you online.

Laura Wimberley

Beach Reads

Book on Beach

Beach Reads http://www.flickr.com/photos/frostis/8081062616/

Looking for something fun to read this summer?  Browse the Bestsellers Collection and the Reading Room on the second floor!  Here are some top picks to keep you blissfully transported on vacation.

DivergentIf you liked The Hunger Games, you will love Divergent by Veronica Roth. Tough-as-nails heroine Tris learns who she is and what she’s made of in a dystopian future Chicago.  The fast-paced cinematic action continues in the sequel, Insurgent – but you’ll have to wait until October for Allegiant, the final book in the trilogy. In the Bestsellers collection on Oviatt’s second floor, call numbers PZ7.R7375 Di 2011 and PZ7.R7375 Ins 2012

Private BerlinThe latest mystery from the always-popular James Patterson is Private Berlin, a grisly thriller.  In the Bestsellers collection on Oviatt’s second floor, call number PS3566.A822 P763 2013

The RookIf you’re looking for both a mystery and a heroine in an alternate world, try The Rook by Daniel O’Malley.  Publishers Weekly says, “Dry wit, surprising reversals of fortune, and a clever if offbeat plot make this a winner. Dr. Who fans will find a lot to like.” In the Bestsellers collection on Oviatt’s second floor, call number PR9619.4.O52 R66 2012

Sophie KinsellaFor a summer read that’s light as chiffon, try the latest from Sophie Kinsella (author of Confessions of a Shopaholic).  I’ve Got Your Number  starts with a lost engagement ring and a cell phone mix up, telling much of the story in text messages and footnoted quips.  A fine romance, perfect for a lazy day of sunbathing.  In the Bestsellers collection on Oviatt’s second floor, call number PR6073.I246 I93 2012

 - Laura Wimberley

It’s Summertime and the Reading is– at the TCC!

Summer is here and some of the best reading can be found in the Oviatt Library’s Teacher Curriculum Center (TCC).  What’s better than buying a book?  Checking one out for free!  It doesn’t get much better than that. 

Book trio

You can re-visit classics of yore (“A Wrinkle in Time,” “The Little Prince”), or catch up on some contemporary “must reads” (“Twilight,” “The Hunger Games”).  Perhaps a childhood favorite?  We even have some graphic novels. TCC’s collection has something for everyone, including a wide variety of picture books perfect for the younger set or even for you.  Stop in and check out, “Pete the Cat,” the “Elephant & Piggie” series, or even “Officer Buckle and Gloria” – books so entertaining that you’ll want to read them again and again (and enjoy their playful artwork).  We also have a great selection of books on CD to keep you entertained on those long, cross country drives.  Imagine having the complete “Harry Potter” series read to you as you navigate the highways and byways!

Silly or serious, fact or fiction, we’ve got your number and it’s unlimited.  What could be finer than sitting poolside or seaside, sipping cool lemonade, wearing shorts, shades and flip flops while taking in the antics of “Huckleberry Finn” or “Ramona the Pest”?  And don’t forget about, “Al Capone Does my Shirts” (we thought you’d be intrigued).  If you have a current CSUN ID card, you hold the passport to a myriad of destinations.

Let reading transport you.  For fun, excitement, adventure, or just a mental scenic getaway, you don’t have to go very far, come to the TCC – it’s the start of any great vacation.

- Mara Houdyshell

Meet the Librarians of the Oviatt

Meet Andrew Weiss, a Digital Services Librarian here at the library. One of his main responsibilities is CSUN’s institutional repository ScholarWorks, which is an open access repository of works authored by CSUN faculty and students, learn more about it here

Andrew Weiss, Digital Services Librarian

Andrew Weiss, Digital Services Librarian

 Where are you originally from?

I grew up in Reading, PA, not far from Philadelphia, but I also spent 8 years living in Japan and consider it like a second home.

What do you admire about CSUN students?

I’m always amazed at their strong desire to engage the world head-on, whether in campus activities, high-quality projects, or social activism. I also see a lot of collaboration going on here in the library among students — banding together to tackle their classes and assignments. When I walk past the study rooms, I often see chalkboards full of notes and equations that I couldn’t begin to decipher.

I’m also impressed with those students who can walk and text on their cell phones without bumping into things. 

Why did you become a librarian?

It’s the perfect hybrid-education role: a combination of classroom teaching, research, historical and archival document preservation, digital technology, social media, project management and digital rights management.  It’s a challenge to become proficient in all those areas. And I like the challenge. There’s always something new to learn.

What is your favorite quote?

“I’m not crazy about reality, but it’s still the only place to get a decent meal.”  – Groucho Marx

What is your favorite book or your top 5?

Too many to count, but the shortlist would have to include: A Confederacy of Dunces by John Kennedy Toole, Coin Locker Babies by Ryu Murakami, & Four Quartets by T.S. Eliot…plus many more.

 What are your research interests?

I’m currently doing research on massive digital libraries such as Google Books, HathiTrust, and Internet Archive (to name a few). I’m also interested in international open access digital library collaborations – especially those related to Japan and East Asia.

 -Laurie Borchard

Health and Society in Video; A New Collection Purchased with NIH/NLM Grant

health logoThe Oviatt has added a collection of 260 videos with funds provided by NIH/NLM Women’s Health Resources and Gender Differences grant. The Health and Society Video collection offers more than 100 videos which address women’s issues in particular. The videos can be viewed on and off campus. There are several ways you can find the collection: as a database, on Databases A-Z  or as individual videos in our Library Catalog. Our catalog has a record for each video in the collection. As an example, the following catalog record for “Wisdom of the Heart” describes the video. The subject headings assigned provide specific detail about the topics covered in the video i.e. Heart Diseases—Sex factors and Sex discrimination in Medicine. Plus a summary explains how women were excluded from medical trials. The records can provide a lot of pertinent information on what you are about to view. The ‘Added Title’ links indicated below with an arrow can also lead you to hundreds more titles on your topic. Follow the link to this catalog record at http://suncat.csun.edu/record=b2916558 and enjoy!

health catalog record

 The website for Women’s Health Resources is at http://www.womenshealthresources.nlm.nih.gov/index.html  where you can further your research.

- Marcia Henry

Research Therapy: Finding Book and Film Reviews Using Library Databases

A book or film review is a valuable tool for providing a brief summary, content description, and contemporary reactions.  Usually appearing shortly after a book is published or a film is released, reviews can be found in various magazines, newspapers, and scholarly journals. The library has many databases that you can use to locate book or film reviews – Here are some of my favorites along with some search strategies specific for each database!

Search Strategy: Helpful Tips to Remember!

    • To find a review you will need to know the title, author, and year of publication.
    • It is important to remember that reviews generally appear near the date of publication up to several years after. Any later and you might be looking at a literary criticism.  Check the inside of the book or the library catalog for the publication date.
    • All of the recommended databases will allow you to specifically limit your search for book or film reviews. Make sure to check “Book Review”, “Review”, or “Entertainment Review” in the refine your search option area.
    • Make sure you are using a database that covers the year the book or film was published or released.
    • If you are having difficulties finding a review remember, of the thousands of books published each year only a small percentage are actually reviewed. It is possible that the book was not reviewed or you may have to search multiple databases to find a review.

For a more complete list of databases & coverage dates, use the following guide:
Using Library Databases to Find Book and Film Reviews

Also, view our new Research Therapy video for more tips and a tutorial on how to use some of these databases!

Good Luck with your research!

~Jamie Johnson   jamie.johnson@csun.edu

Secret Google Tips

Google imageYou probably use Google all day, every day.  Google’s default search is powerful enough to easily get you good results most of the time.  But did you know there are ways to use Google to get precisely what you want?

Google Scholar searches as broadly as possible for academic research.  It’s a good choice for very specific or obscure topics. You can even use Google Scholar to access CSUN subscription content

Another option for authoritative websites is searching by a specific domain, like .com, .edu, or .gov. Just add site:.edu to your search terms to look only at results from educational institutions, or site:.gov to your terms to search only US government websites.

For example, if you search for crime statistics, you’ll get a mix of police departments, newspaper reports, Wikipedia, and real estate websites, which might not be reliable, precise, or current. But if you search for crime statistics site:.gov, your very first result will be the official FBI Uniform Crime Statistics – the most detailed, comprehensive reliable source for crime statistics in the US.

Did you know Google has a reverse image search?  Maybe you’ve found the perfect image for a presentation, but you don’t know the photographer to cite. Start at Google Image Search, then click on the camera icon to the right of the search bar.  You can upload a picture or paste in an image URL, and Google will display pages that include matching images.

If you’re taking a course in Education or Child & Adolescent Development, you might want to find webpages by reading level – basic, intermediate, or advanced.

Google reading level

More options are available at google.com/advanced_search.  You can limit your results by language, country, date last updated, and more.

For more help using Google, ask a librarian!

- Laura Wimberley

Meet the Librarians of the Oviatt

Music & Media Librarian, Lindsay Hansen

Music & Media Librarian, Lindsay Hansen

Meet Lindsay Hansen, the Music & Media Librarian here at the Oviatt.  She’s been at CSUN for almost seven years. Not only is she passionate about helping students, but she also has been known to breakout in freestyle dance.

Where are you originally from?
Bloomington, MN, home of the Mall of America

What do you admire most about CSUN students?
 They juggle a lot more challenges than I did in college—they are working full-time jobs, commuting long distances, and might be the first in their family to go to college.

What’s your favorite book?
 Pink Slip by Rita Ciresi

What songs would you include on the soundtrack of your life?
Take Me Home Tonight  by Eddie Money

 Why did you become a librarian?
After trying other fields, I thought it would be a good way to help music students and faculty find what they need and conduct better research.  Librarianship is the perfect way to match my love for music (without performing) with my love for research.

What do you wish every student knew about the library or librarians?
That we will stop at nothing to find an answer or help. If I don’t know the answer to something, I’ll find it.

What’s your favorite quote?
Seid bereit, immer bereit!  It is an East German expression that means “be prepared, always prepared.”

Is there a specific class that you really enjoy doing library instruction for?
Any of the music classes, especially music history and the research seminar for grad students.

If you could meet anyone living or dead who would it be?
Probably Frédéric Chopin, my favorite composer.

What are your research interests?
East German popular music, German primary resources available in the United States, and the information-seeking behavior of Germanists.

  -Laurie Borchard

Come Visit the Newly Renovated TCC!

TCCHave you ever heard the story of the Ugly Duckling who turns into a beautiful swan?* The Teacher Curriculum Center (TCC) has recently undergone a similar transformation.  It has traded in its older furniture for a more modern look and function. The TCC now has moveable tables, chairs, and white boards which create a dynamic work space. Students can rearrange the study area to suit their needs and create an environment that truly belongs to them; it also allows for both individual and group study. And that’s not all! The TCC also added a “study bar” suitable for use with laptops and easy access to the electrical outlets.  In our reading area, we have new lounge chairs with back screens for privacy and small tables for your coffee, laptops, and (of course) books. When you exit the elevator to access the TCC, you will encounter the TCC New Item Display. Our display area went from a repurposed desk to bookcases that serve to highlight our collection. The TCC study area has also been repainted; the new lively yellow “Baby Chick” wall color will brighten up your day. All improvements have been made possible by the Students’ Campus Quality Fee.

So what do the students think? They love it! They say that the new paint color wakes them up in the morning and keeps them energized. One student said “It is brighter and that makes the environment seem more welcoming.” “I really like the new furniture. It is moveable for study groups! I also like the study bar! Thank you” says another. Other feedback we received: “The area looks clean and organized. I can imagine coming down here to study and work with a group.”

Matadors are discovering and talking about the new TCC. Hopefully library patrons continue to discover the TCC. We’re glad to be serving and satisfying the needs of our students.

*If you haven’t read the story come to the TCC, we have it here!

- Gabriel Castaneda

gabriel.castaneda@csun.edu

Discover Hugo Award Winners at the Oviatt

Hugo AwardEscape to other worlds by diving into some of the best contemporary writing – this year’s Hugo Award nominees.  

The nominees available at the Oviatt are:

For more geeky reads, check out Oviatt’s collection of graphic novels, science fiction, and fantasy.

And scifi fans won’t want to miss our exhibit Fantastic and Strange: Reflections of Self in Science Fiction Literature, on view on the second floor in the Tseng Gallery until July 26.

- Laura Wimberley