Matadors Enjoy De-Stressing Activities at the Library

Sheltie dog named Tramp and students

Photo by Lee Choo

During finals week, many CSUN students found themselves at the Library with a need to study, in addition to a need to take study breaks. The Library provided several offerings to help students de-stress. These activities supported students to recharge and diverted their attention if only for a brief time. One of the most popular activities offered at the Library during finals week was the opportunity for students to visit with licensed therapy dogs. Students were able to spend time with and pet a variety of good-natured animals including a Sheltie, Golden Retriever, Shih Tzu, Dachshund, Boxer Mix and Labrador Retrievers. Students also participated in arts & crafts sessions that enabled them to relax and spend time coloring, in addition to making buttons. Board games were available for check-out at the Guest Services desk, and a graffiti board in the Learning Commons allowed students to express their angst about finals. Finally, disposable pillows were distributed for those students who nodded off at times, or for those who simply needed a soft place to rest their head while studying. Below are some highlights of the therapy dog event. – Coleen Martin

Dog named Sparky and students

Photo by Lee Choo

Boxer mix dog named Mel and students

Photo by Lee Choo

Golden Retriever named Rocket and students

Photo by Lee Choo

Sheltie dog named Tramp with group of students

Photo by Luis Garcia

Sparky dog and students taking a selfie

Photo by Luis Garcia

Golden Retriever named Rocket with student

Photo by Luis Garcia

Dog named Fred gets belly scratched

Photo by Luis Garcia

Boxer mix named Mel

Photo by Lee Choo

Take a Study Break at the Library During Finals Week

Graffiti BoardHello Matadors! Good luck with all of your finals this coming week. To help make it a stress-free experience, the Library will be providing some study break activities. There will be arts & crafts sessions on Wed., Dec. 9 and Fri., Dec. 11. Please join us for coloring, button making and the opportunity to create your very own sculpture with Play-Doh! On Wed., Dec. 9 Pictionary games will be taking place, and board games will be available for check out at the Guest Services Desk in the lobby all week long. Complimentary pillows will be available to all CSUN students as well. We expect they may be useful during our extended Library hours. We want you to feel free to express yourself too. There will be a graffiti board in the Learning Commons for those who wish to share their angst about finals. And finally, you won’t want to miss the therapy dogs that will be visiting the Library on Thurs., Dec. 10. Come pet a dog and put a smile on your face. Most of the activities will be taking place in the AS/RS Viewing Room, main floor, west wing. Please see the study break flyer for the timing of these events and for more information. We look forward to seeing you in the Library preparing for your exams and taking study breaks with us!

– Coleen Martin

Local Students Find Resources at the Oviatt

NAHS students

Northridge Academy High School students

Many local students visit the Oviatt Library for tours and to find out about the resources and services available to them each year. Some classes visit the Library for instruction sessions as well. In fact, last year, 68 Library tours were provided to 1,143 local students and 37 Library lectures were provided to 1,190 local students to support them to be successful in their coursework.

Most recently, Granada Hills Charter High School (GHCHS) history classes visited the Library to find sources for a senior research project. Many of these students were not aware of the 200 databases available to them at the Oviatt Library prior to their visit. They spent time searching in the databases; evaluating information; and eventually downloading and emailing articles to themselves. Many students explored ebooks during the session. They also were able to find books in the stacks and check them out prior to completing their visit. Last year alone, 431 local high school students within the San Fernando Valley checked out Oviatt Library books for their research needs and assignments.

During their visits to the Library, these students find out about the research help they can receive from a librarian at the reference desk in the Learning Commons or virtually through our Ask A Librarian service. These visits to the Library support them to be successful in their coursework; help to prepare them for the academic rigors of university level research; and support them to acclimate to campus, as many of these students will become CSUN students after high school.

Additional local high school students will be visiting the Library next semester. We look forward to working with these students and their teachers in the coming year.

– Coleen Martin

How to Read Citations

Have you ever stared at a citation and had no idea if it was a book, chapter in a book, article or website? This infographic in our Research Therapy series breaks down citations for you, highlighting the various elements that make up a citation.

How to read a citation

Book Citations 

Elements of a book citation: author, title of book, publisher information, year. and format.

Elements of a chapter in a book citation: author of chapter, title of chapter, title of book, editor of book, publisher information, and page range of chapters.

Book Clues:

  • If the citation has publisher name and location, it’s a book!
  • In MLA citation style the format means the medium of publication.
  • E-books may have a URL, database name, or date of access at the end of the citation.

Article Citations

Elements of magazine and journal article citations: author, title of article, title of publication, volume number, issue number, year of publication, and page numbers.

Elements of a newspaper article: author, title of article, title of publication, date of publication, page number or section.

For articles found in an online library database the only difference in the citation is the addition at the end of the citation of the following; name of the database, format, access date, and sometimes the URL or DOI.

Article Clue:

  • All published articles will have two titles; the title of the article and the title of the journal/magazine/newspaper.
  • In MLA the format for an article in a library database will say “web”, but it’s not a website.
  • Magazines may just have a month of publication instead of a volume and issue number.
  • Depending on the citations style, you may see a URL or DOI for an article in an online database.

Website Citations

The elements of a website citation usually include: author/editor, title of work or page, name of the website, publisher or sponsor of website, title URL, date of publication, format, and access date.

Website Clues:

  • Websites may not provide publication dates.
  • Websites don’t always have authors, they may just list the organization that created the website.
  • Depending on the citation style, you may see the term “retrieved from” followed by a URL.

Things to Remember

  • Every citation style is different, but the elements of what makes up a citation are the same.
  • If you’re unsure of what type of article it is, just Google the name of the publication
  • You can always ask a librarian for help!

– Laurie Borchard

Refill Your Water Bottles at the Oviatt!

Water Bottle Refilling StationIt’s common to see a line of students waiting for their coffee or other drinks at the Freudian Sip coffeehouse in the Library Learning Common’s lobby. Now there is another line you will often see on the other side of the lobby, a spot where students are eager to fill their empty bottles with cool, filtered water.

The Oviatt Library recently installed a water bottle filling station in the Learning Commons lobby through funding from the Campus Quality Fee. The installation and use of the station increases campus sustainability efforts, and provides students with the opportunity to save money, as they can refill their water bottles instead of buying a new one each time. Having a new water bottle filling station for students to use in the Library also means there will be fewer plastic bottles to be thrown away.

According to those at the Library who initiated and carried out the project, “Students will be made aware of campus sustainability goals in terms of water consumption . . . Students and visitors to the Oviatt will be able to see that our University and student body are continuing to take steps to become more environmentally conscious.” Team members who coordinated with campus facilities to bring the water bottle filling station to the Library Learning Commons lobby include Sarah Sayeed, Lynn Lampert, Marianne Afifi and Jason Billick.

These Oviatt Library efforts join others on campus who also have taken steps to make our campus more eco-friendly. A partnership between the Associated Students Environmental Affairs Committee and CSUN Physical Plant Management is responsible for installing other water bottle refill stations in eight colleges throughout the CSUN campus. These other stations can be found in Juniper Hall, the Education building, Chaparral Hall, Sierra Hall, Jerome Richfield Hall, Manzanita Hall, Redwood Hall, and Sequoia Hall. So if you are thirsty, and need a refill, please feel free to visit the Oviatt Library Learning Commons water bottle filling station or any of the other many refilling spots on the CSUN campus!

– Coleen Martin