Tag Archives: citations

How to Read Citations

Have you ever stared at a citation and had no idea if it was a book, chapter in a book, article or website? This infographic in our Research Therapy series breaks down citations for you, highlighting the various elements that make up a citation.

How to read a citation

Book Citations 

Elements of a book citation: author, title of book, publisher information, year. and format.

Elements of a chapter in a book citation: author of chapter, title of chapter, title of book, editor of book, publisher information, and page range of chapters.

Book Clues:

  • If the citation has publisher name and location, it’s a book!
  • In MLA citation style the format means the medium of publication.
  • E-books may have a URL, database name, or date of access at the end of the citation.

Article Citations

Elements of magazine and journal article citations: author, title of article, title of publication, volume number, issue number, year of publication, and page numbers.

Elements of a newspaper article: author, title of article, title of publication, date of publication, page number or section.

For articles found in an online library database the only difference in the citation is the addition at the end of the citation of the following; name of the database, format, access date, and sometimes the URL or DOI.

Article Clue:

  • All published articles will have two titles; the title of the article and the title of the journal/magazine/newspaper.
  • In MLA the format for an article in a library database will say “web”, but it’s not a website.
  • Magazines may just have a month of publication instead of a volume and issue number.
  • Depending on the citations style, you may see a URL or DOI for an article in an online database.

Website Citations

The elements of a website citation usually include: author/editor, title of work or page, name of the website, publisher or sponsor of website, title URL, date of publication, format, and access date.

Website Clues:

  • Websites may not provide publication dates.
  • Websites don’t always have authors, they may just list the organization that created the website.
  • Depending on the citation style, you may see the term “retrieved from” followed by a URL.

Things to Remember

  • Every citation style is different, but the elements of what makes up a citation are the same.
  • If you’re unsure of what type of article it is, just Google the name of the publication
  • You can always ask a librarian for help!

– Laurie Borchard

Web of Science now available at the Oviatt Library

Web of ScienceThe Web of Science database is now accessible through the Oviatt Library’s current database collection. Often referred to as the most interdisciplinary and comprehensive subscription-based citation resource, the Web of Science extracts citation information from articles in more than 10,000 journals from a wide variety of disciplines. Quite commonly, Web of Science users are able to forgo searching for citation information in numerous different databases only to find, analyze and share scientific and citation information easily with this very unique research tool. Here are just some of the Web of Science’s features:

  • Find a citation count for an article;
  • Determine which journal articles have cited a particular work;
  • Find current articles on a topic;
  • Create a citation map for an article which illustrates the connections between citing authors, institutions and fields of study;
  • Provide a citation analysis report for an author;
  • Determine the most highly cited works for an author;
  • Determine the most highly cited articles for a journal;
  • Identify top researchers in a field;
  • Eliminate self-citations from a citation count.

Disciplines that publish heavily in journal literature such as the sciences are better covered in the Web of Science than other subject areas such as business and education. In these instances we recommend referring to the Oviatt’s Searching Cited References Guide. Or for more information contact us at Ask A Librarian.

–         Coleen Martin

Research Therapy: Keeping Those References in Line

You’re almost there! You dominated that test, you perfected your presentation, you’ve written a gazillion pages. But, one thing looms:

works cited page

You have options! Let me introduce 5 free tools that will help you keep your citations organized as well as generate your citations for you. But remember: each of these citation tools are only meant to HELP you. If the computer makes a mistake, you’re the one getting marked down for it. Use the Oviatt Library’s Cite Your Sources page thoughtfully—for proofreading and more.

Save this record

 

http://library.csun.edu/

zotero

 

http://www.zotero.org/

mendeley

 

http://www.mendeley.com/

Endnote Basic

 

http://www.myendnoteweb.com/

EasyBib

 

http://easybib.com/

Research Therapy video screenshot

If you would like to get more acquainted with any of these tools, there are plenty of tutorials on YouTube as well as courtesy of The University of Texas Libraries.

If you’d like some human interaction to go along with your citations, just ask a librarian.

– Anna Fidgeon