Tag Archives: Research Therapy

Two New Tutorials Are Here To Help with Finding Books

Hi matadors! We hope your semester is moving along wonderfully. Today we have two brand new video tutorials to debut. As your research may be well underway we present some basics of how to navigate through the library catalog. The ability to find books is a necessary skill for many of your research papers. First is How to find a Book, using the Library Catalog and OneSearch. The second is how to find books on Course Reserve. Hope they help you and good luck with your research!

Using the Library Catalog to find books

Searching Course Reserves to find books

~Jamie Johnson jamie.johnson@csun.edu

Research Therapy: The Info-Cycle

In Session 12 of Research Therapy, we learned ways to identify different types of information. So how do you decide what information is best for you to use? Let’s take a quick (and grossly oversimplified) look at the Cycle of Information:

Of course, there are going to be outliers and other types of information that might work for you (diaries! letters! art! oh my!), but the two most important things to remember are: 1.) follow your professor’s assignment requirements and 2.) be critical: know the who, what, when, where, how, and why of your resource. Our session on Evaluating Websites can be applied to any resource.

Be sure to check out #researchRx on Twitter for a quick fix on research tips!

Good luck on those long research papers! If you need help, don’t forget you can Ask a Librarian.

- Anna Fidgeon

Research Therapy: Types of Information Sources

It’s the beginning of the semester and most of your instructors have probably given you your research assignments. Maybe it’s a presentation, or a paper or an annotated bibliography? It’s time to begin searching for sources to support your research, but before you begin your search you should have an understanding of the different types of information sources that will be most useful for your research topic. http://youtu.be/iPCte4BmWTQ Another valuable type of resource is government documents. They offer a lot of primary sources and secondary sources as well. Some examples include: • census data • congressional hearings and court transcripts • maps (current and historical) • patents, trademarks and copyrights • statistics regarding education, health, environment, transportation and more • consumer information and statistics Check out our online guides to government resources: general guide to Government Publications at the Oviatt Library and a list of all our Government Publication Subject Guides. Now that you know the different types of sources available to you, take another look at your research topic or question and decide which kind of source you need to support your research. To help you decide which sources would be best, think about the currency of your topic and the type of evidence you need to support your ideas. The following table is an example of different types of research and the appropriate sources.

Current events & trends
Newspapers, news websites, magazines
Case studies, ethnographic research, longitudinal studies
Scholarly journals & books
Statistics and legal documents
Government documents and websites
Topic overviews & definitions
Reference & books
In-depth analysis on a topic
Scholarly journals & books


– Laurie Borchard

Research Therapy: Finding an Article From a Citation Using OneSearch

Do citations look like this to you:

nonsense citation with random characters and wingdings

and somehow you are expected to find that article and read it before your next class? So you just copy and paste the whole thing into the library website and come up with nothing. Then, you start to wonder why your professor lied to you and said it was available at the library? You begin to question this whole college thing and reconsider running away with the circus.

STOP THERE!

Watch this video to learn where to go to break the citation code and how to find an article from a citation using the Oviatt’s electronic databases:

 article citation in onesearch research therapy video

 Putting a whole citation into OneSearch makes it sad. All it wants is the title of the article, which in many citation styles, comes before the title of the journal. You can use the rest of the citation as a reference to make sure the article you are accessing is exactly the article you were looking for in the first place, and not a similarly titled one.

APA citation

Be sure to bookmark some of these online resources for citation help:

Cite Your Sources: detailed guides for APA and MLA style citations along with help for other styles.

Research Therapy: Citing Your Sources: an explanation on why, when & how you should cite. Includes help on citing unusual resources, such as Twitter, blogs, maps and more.

Citation Managers: Comparison of Features: this guide from UW- Madison Libraries explains your options for citation managers that will help you organize and keep track of your sources as well as help you decipher the components.

Like always, librarians are here for you. Just ask.

- Anna Fidgeon

Research Therapy: Finding Book and Film Reviews Using Library Databases

A book or film review is a valuable tool for providing a brief summary, content description, and contemporary reactions.  Usually appearing shortly after a book is published or a film is released, reviews can be found in various magazines, newspapers, and scholarly journals. The library has many databases that you can use to locate book or film reviews – Here are some of my favorites along with some search strategies specific for each database!

Search Strategy: Helpful Tips to Remember!

    • To find a review you will need to know the title, author, and year of publication.
    • It is important to remember that reviews generally appear near the date of publication up to several years after. Any later and you might be looking at a literary criticism.  Check the inside of the book or the library catalog for the publication date.
    • All of the recommended databases will allow you to specifically limit your search for book or film reviews. Make sure to check “Book Review”, “Review”, or “Entertainment Review” in the refine your search option area.
    • Make sure you are using a database that covers the year the book or film was published or released.
    • If you are having difficulties finding a review remember, of the thousands of books published each year only a small percentage are actually reviewed. It is possible that the book was not reviewed or you may have to search multiple databases to find a review.

For a more complete list of databases & coverage dates, use the following guide:
Using Library Databases to Find Book and Film Reviews

Also, view our new Research Therapy video for more tips and a tutorial on how to use some of these databases!

Good Luck with your research!

~Jamie Johnson   jamie.johnson@csun.edu

Research Therapy: Finding Fiction Books at the Library Is Easy

Need a break from academic reading and looking for some fun books?

Well you don’t have to go very far to check out the Oviatt Library’s fiction collection. We have a variety of fiction books to fulfill your reading needs. Watch the new Research Therapy video session to learn where you can find them!

fiction books video

In addition, here is a quick guide of the different locations you can find our fiction books:

Image of Books on the Garden Floor of the Oviatt Library
For Young Adult and Children’s fiction visit the Teacher’s Curricular Center (TCC).
Image of Books on the Main Floor of the Oviatt Library
Try looking in the Bestsellers Collection for popular fiction – just next to the reference desk.
Image of Books on the Second Floor of the Oviatt Library
The Bob and Maureen Gohstand Leisure Reading Room located off the Tseng Gallery in the West Wing houses a variety of fiction literature.
Image of Books on the Third Floor of the Oviatt Library
Try browsing the Language and Literature section. These fiction books will be shelved with other literature such as essays, drama, poetry and literary criticism. Generally speaking, English-language fiction can be found in the PR and PS sections on shelves. PR for English fiction and PS for American fiction.

 Please tell us what you think about our Research Therapy videos at our survey.

Thank you.

- Anna Fidgeon

  - Jamie Johnson

Research Therapy: Need help coming up with a topic for your research paper or project?

Our new session of Research Therapy gives you ideas on where to look for topic ideas, how to narrow your topic, as well as a couple of online library resources that are a great place to begin your research. 

Topic Exploration image for video

Concept Mapping

Concept mapping is a great way to expand on a general topic; it also helps you to think about the different aspects of your topic. Here’s a template for a basic concept map. Here’s another concept map when you’re trying to identify the who, what, when, where, why or how of a topic.

As mentioned in the video keep in mind the different angles you could take on a topic:

  • Geographical → where
  • Sociological → who
  • Psychological → why
  • Historical → when

Library Databases

After you pick a general topic it’s a good idea to do some general background resources. Oviatt Library has several different online reference resources such as encyclopedias, dictionaries, biographical resources and more. The databases mentioned in the video are Opposing Viewpoints in Context and Credo Reference.  We also have a list of online reference resources listed under the Find Articles by Subject page, as well as an organized list of our databases by subject.  We also have a general Research Strategies guide to help you along with the research process.

 -Laurie Borchard        laurie.borchard@csun.edu

Please tell us what you think about our Research Therapy videos at our survey. Thank you.

Research Therapy: Women’s Health Resources

The Oviatt Library has partnered with the National Library of Medicine and National Institutes of Health for this special session of Research Therapy. For more information see ‘Cited at the Oviatt’ blog post 3/6/2013.

Surely you’ve been faced with a women’s health question that needs answering—either in your own life or for a project. Of course, you should ask your doctor if you have a particular ailment that needs attention, but sometimes you want to get some preliminary information online that is free of ads and written by trustworthy health care experts. Or maybe you want to write your final paper on the emotional impact of high school bullying on lesbians, but you know Googling “lesbian teenagers” is probably not going to get you the results you need for a school paper.

So where to start? Take a look at Women’s Health Resources—an online portal to women’s health and wellness information and research funded by the National Institutes of Health. This video will give you a tour:

Research Therapy

The information and research found on Women’s Health Resources comes from a number of valuable NIH and NLM collections. Learn more below about three in particular: ClinicalTrials.gov, MedlinePlus, and PubMed.

medicine bottle

At ClinicalTrials.gov, you can see the status of clinical trials as well as data from finished studies.

What is a clinical study?  A clinical study involves research using human volunteers (also called participants) that is intended to add to medical knowledge.  There are two main types of clinical studies: clinical trials and observational studies.  ClinicalTrials.gov includes both interventional and observational studies
http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/about-studies/learn#WhatIs

Image courtesy CDC Public Health Image Library / Amanda Mills

Medline Plus image - Woman

MedlinePlus offers objective up-to-date health information in easy-to-understand language.  Get background information on diseases, conditions, wellness, drugs, treatments, and more.

Image courtesy CDC Public Health Image Library / Amanda Mills

Graham Stain

Pubmed is a collection of citations from biomedical research in journals, books and more.  Connect to CSUN resources (so you can read the full articles) by accessing Pubmed from the Oviatt Library website.

http://library.csun.edu/xerxes/databases/database/CAL03160
Image courtesy CDC Public Health Image Library / Dr. Libero Ajello

The Oviatt Library also has plenty of women’s health material for your research needs. We offer subject databases and resource guides in both Health Sciences and Gender and Women’s Studies.

If you are using Google or another search engine to find online resources on women’s health, make sure you check out our session of Research Therapy all about website evaluation. You wouldn’t ask just anyone on the street for health information, so don’t accept it from just anywhere on the internet!

Whether it’s for yourself, a research project, or “a friend”, if you need help finding health information or Women’s Health Resources, contact the following librarians:

Lynn Lampert: lynn.lampert@csun.edu

Marcia Henry: marcia.henry@csun.edu

Anna Fidgeon: annaliese.fidgeon@csun.edu

- Anna Fidgeon

Please tell us what you think about our Research Therapy videos at our survey. Thank you.

Research Therapy: You Don’t Have to Come to the Library to Get a Library Book

You know you don’t have to come into the library to get your hands on some books, right? And if you’ve ever checked out a book from the library, only to find it doesn’t have any information you need, you should try looking at Google Books first.

The Oviatt has hundreds of e-books available, straight off of the website. Even if the book you want isn’t available electronically, you can still use Google Books to take a peek at the content. You might save yourself a trip! Watch this video to learn more:

ebooks video image

We want your feedback! What do you think of Research Therapy? What would you like to see in future episodes? Please, fill out our survey:

https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/J9QWNY8

- Anna Fidgeon

Please tell us what you think about our Research Therapy videos at our survey. Thank you.

Research Therapy: Citing Your Sources

The sixth installment of Research Therapy gives you a brief overview of why you need to cite, when you should cite and how you should cite.

Do you have a research paper or project coming up and your instructor wants a specific number of sources? Knowing when and how to cite your sources can be a little confusing. The most important thing that you need to know is that you need to cite anything you use that doesn’t originate from you. Not only should you do this when you’re writing a paper or working on a research project, but also when creating a presentation or a website. You should cite tweets, blog posts, images, podcasts, and YouTube videos, basically anything you use that you did not create yourself.

citing image

Citation Styles
Different academic disciplines have different citation styles, it’s important that you know what style your instructor wants you to use. Here’s some examples of the different styles.

citation chart

Citing Special Resources?
Here’s a list of resources and guides for citing less common sources.
Government Documents
Business Resources : a comprehensive guide from Harvard Business School on citing various types of sources, including reports, interviews, and legal cases (just to name a few).
• This guide from Boise State gives examples of citing images, Twitter, Facebook, blog posts, maps, and videos.

Need More Help?
For additional help on creating citations using various styles check out Oviatt Library’s Citing Your Sources guide. For a quick how-to on creating an annotated bibliography, check out session three of the Research Therapy video series.
Still confused, about plagiarism? Check out this online tutorial created by UCLA students.

-Laurie Borchard

laurie.borchard@csun.edu

Please tell us what you think about our Research Therapy videos at our survey. Thank you.