Monthly Archives: May 2013

Health and Society in Video; A New Collection Purchased with NIH/NLM Grant

health logoThe Oviatt has added a collection of 260 videos with funds provided by NIH/NLM Women’s Health Resources and Gender Differences grant. The Health and Society Video collection offers more than 100 videos which address women’s issues in particular. The videos can be viewed on and off campus. There are several ways you can find the collection: as a database, on Databases A-Z  or as individual videos in our Library Catalog. Our catalog has a record for each video in the collection. As an example, the following catalog record for “Wisdom of the Heart” describes the video. The subject headings assigned provide specific detail about the topics covered in the video i.e. Heart Diseases—Sex factors and Sex discrimination in Medicine. Plus a summary explains how women were excluded from medical trials. The records can provide a lot of pertinent information on what you are about to view. The ‘Added Title’ links indicated below with an arrow can also lead you to hundreds more titles on your topic. Follow the link to this catalog record at http://suncat.csun.edu/record=b2916558 and enjoy!

health catalog record

 The website for Women’s Health Resources is at http://www.womenshealthresources.nlm.nih.gov/index.html  where you can further your research.

- Marcia Henry

Research Therapy: Finding Book and Film Reviews Using Library Databases

A book or film review is a valuable tool for providing a brief summary, content description, and contemporary reactions.  Usually appearing shortly after a book is published or a film is released, reviews can be found in various magazines, newspapers, and scholarly journals. The library has many databases that you can use to locate book or film reviews – Here are some of my favorites along with some search strategies specific for each database!

Search Strategy: Helpful Tips to Remember!

    • To find a review you will need to know the title, author, and year of publication.
    • It is important to remember that reviews generally appear near the date of publication up to several years after. Any later and you might be looking at a literary criticism.  Check the inside of the book or the library catalog for the publication date.
    • All of the recommended databases will allow you to specifically limit your search for book or film reviews. Make sure to check “Book Review”, “Review”, or “Entertainment Review” in the refine your search option area.
    • Make sure you are using a database that covers the year the book or film was published or released.
    • If you are having difficulties finding a review remember, of the thousands of books published each year only a small percentage are actually reviewed. It is possible that the book was not reviewed or you may have to search multiple databases to find a review.

For a more complete list of databases & coverage dates, use the following guide:
Using Library Databases to Find Book and Film Reviews

Also, view our new Research Therapy video for more tips and a tutorial on how to use some of these databases!

Good Luck with your research!

~Jamie Johnson   jamie.johnson@csun.edu

Secret Google Tips

Google imageYou probably use Google all day, every day.  Google’s default search is powerful enough to easily get you good results most of the time.  But did you know there are ways to use Google to get precisely what you want?

Google Scholar searches as broadly as possible for academic research.  It’s a good choice for very specific or obscure topics. You can even use Google Scholar to access CSUN subscription content

Another option for authoritative websites is searching by a specific domain, like .com, .edu, or .gov. Just add site:.edu to your search terms to look only at results from educational institutions, or site:.gov to your terms to search only US government websites.

For example, if you search for crime statistics, you’ll get a mix of police departments, newspaper reports, Wikipedia, and real estate websites, which might not be reliable, precise, or current. But if you search for crime statistics site:.gov, your very first result will be the official FBI Uniform Crime Statistics – the most detailed, comprehensive reliable source for crime statistics in the US.

Did you know Google has a reverse image search?  Maybe you’ve found the perfect image for a presentation, but you don’t know the photographer to cite. Start at Google Image Search, then click on the camera icon to the right of the search bar.  You can upload a picture or paste in an image URL, and Google will display pages that include matching images.

If you’re taking a course in Education or Child & Adolescent Development, you might want to find webpages by reading level – basic, intermediate, or advanced.

Google reading level

More options are available at google.com/advanced_search.  You can limit your results by language, country, date last updated, and more.

For more help using Google, ask a librarian!

- Laura Wimberley

Meet the Librarians of the Oviatt

Music & Media Librarian, Lindsay Hansen

Music & Media Librarian, Lindsay Hansen

Meet Lindsay Hansen, the Music & Media Librarian here at the Oviatt.  She’s been at CSUN for almost seven years. Not only is she passionate about helping students, but she also has been known to breakout in freestyle dance.

Where are you originally from?
Bloomington, MN, home of the Mall of America

What do you admire most about CSUN students?
 They juggle a lot more challenges than I did in college—they are working full-time jobs, commuting long distances, and might be the first in their family to go to college.

What’s your favorite book?
 Pink Slip by Rita Ciresi

What songs would you include on the soundtrack of your life?
Take Me Home Tonight  by Eddie Money

 Why did you become a librarian?
After trying other fields, I thought it would be a good way to help music students and faculty find what they need and conduct better research.  Librarianship is the perfect way to match my love for music (without performing) with my love for research.

What do you wish every student knew about the library or librarians?
That we will stop at nothing to find an answer or help. If I don’t know the answer to something, I’ll find it.

What’s your favorite quote?
Seid bereit, immer bereit!  It is an East German expression that means “be prepared, always prepared.”

Is there a specific class that you really enjoy doing library instruction for?
Any of the music classes, especially music history and the research seminar for grad students.

If you could meet anyone living or dead who would it be?
Probably Frédéric Chopin, my favorite composer.

What are your research interests?
East German popular music, German primary resources available in the United States, and the information-seeking behavior of Germanists.

  -Laurie Borchard