New OneSearch, New Search Tips

Hello Matadors!

The Library website now offers a new and improved version of OneSearch. You will be able to search for books, e-books, videos, articles, digital media, and more. The following are several FAQs about using the new OneSearch. These and other OneSearch FAQs will be posted to this blog during the coming months.

Q: What are the benefits of the new OneSearch?

A: There are many benefits to this new search tool. The new OneSearch offers an improved interface; the ability to request books easily and quickly from other CSU campuses; and longer borrowing periods.

Q: How do I look for books in the new OneSearch?

A: Enter the title of your book in OneSearch. Submit search. Look for the “Book” or “Electronic Book” results within the results list. Or, if you do not know the title of the book you are searching for, enter your search terms in OneSearch and submit search. Narrow the results list to books by selecting “Books” or “eBooks” under the Resource Type heading in the left column as illustrated below.

Q: How do I look for articles in the new OneSearch?

A: Enter the title of your article in OneSearch. Submit search. Look for the title listed as an “Article” within the results list. Or, if you do not know the title of the article you are searching for, enter your search terms in OneSearch and submit search. Narrow the results list to articles by selecting “Articles” under the Resource Type in the left column as illustrated below.

Q: Where do I find the Library catalog?

A: The information in the Library catalog has been incorporated into the Library’s new OneSearch. You can use the Advanced Search in OneSearch to access similar search features of the former catalog.

 

Check Out Our Summer Reading Picks!

Swing Time book cover letteringSwing Time by Zadie Smith

An ambitious, exuberant new novel moving from North West London to West Africa, from the multi-award-winning author of White Teeth and On Beauty. Two brown girls dream of being dancers—but only one, Tracey, has talent. The other has ideas: about rhythm and time, about black bodies and black music, what constitutes a tribe, or makes a person truly free. It’s a close but complicated childhood friendship that ends abruptly in their early twenties, never to be revisited, but never quite forgotten, either. Tracey makes it to the chorus line but struggles with adult life, while her friend leaves the old neighborhood behind, traveling the world as an assistant to a famous singer, Aimee, observing close up how the one percent live. But when Aimee develops grand philanthropic ambitions, the story moves from London to West Africa, where diaspora tourists travel back in time to find their roots, young men risk their lives to escape into a different future, the women dance just like Tracey—the same twists, the same shakes—and the origins of a profound inequality are not a matter of distant history, but a present dance to the music of time. Swing Time is a New York Times Best Seller and a Finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award for Fiction. -Penguin Random House. Recommended by Nancy Young. Location information: http://tinyurl.com/yaccy8tn

suitcase sitting on a barren roadPanorama City by Antoine Wilson

Heir to A Confederacy of Dunces and Being TherePanorama City is a wildly entertaining and surreptitiously moving novel about a self-described “slow absorber” named Oppen Porter, who records everything he thinks his unborn son will find useful in becoming a man of the world. Panorama City is the Winner of the 2017 San Fernando Valley Fiction Award. – Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. Recommended by Mark Stover. Location information: http://tinyurl.com/yakjneav

 

picture of the moonKillers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI by David Grann

In the 1920s, the richest people per capita in the world were members of the Osage Indian nation in Oklahoma. After oil was discovered beneath their land, they rode in chauffeured automobiles, built mansions, and sent their children to study in Europe. Then, one by one, the Osage began to be killed off. The family of an Osage woman, Mollie Burkhart, became a prime target. Her relatives were shot and poisoned. And it was just the beginning, as more and more members of the tribe began to die under mysterious circumstances. In this last remnant of the Wild West—where oilmen like J. P. Getty made their fortunes and where desperadoes like Al Spencer, the “Phantom Terror,” roamed—many of those who dared to investigate the killings were themselves murdered. As the death toll climbed to more than twenty-four, the FBI took up the case. It was one of the organization’s first major homicide investigations and the bureau badly bungled the case. In desperation, the young director, J. Edgar Hoover, turned to a former Texas Ranger named Tom White to unravel the mystery. White put together an undercover team, including one of the only American Indian agents in the bureau. The agents infiltrated the region, struggling to adopt the latest techniques of detection.  Together with the Osage they began to expose one of the most chilling conspiracies in American history. In Killers of the Flower Moon, David Grann revisits a shocking series of crimes in which dozens of people were murdered in cold blood. Based on years of research and startling new evidence, the book is a masterpiece of narrative nonfiction, as each step in the investigation reveals a series of sinister secrets and reversals. But more than that, it is a searing indictment of the callousness and prejudice toward American Indians that allowed the murderers to operate with impunity for so long. Killers of the Flower Moon is utterly compelling, but also emotionally devastating. – Penguin Random House. Recommended by Lynn Lampert. Location information: http://tinyurl.com/y75g9hoh

Love Medicine by Louise Erdrich  a tent outside at dusk

Set on and around a North Dakota Ojibwe reservation, Love Medicine—the first novel by bestselling, National Book Award-winning author Louise Erdrich—is the epic story about the intertwined fates of two families: the Kashpaws and the Lamartines. With astonishing virtuosity, each chapter draws on a range of voices to limn its tales. Black humor mingles with magic, injustice bleeds into betrayal, and through it all, bonds of love and family marry the elements into a tightly woven whole that pulses with the drama of life. Filled with humor, magic, injustice and betrayal, Erdrich blends family love and loyalty in a stunning work of dramatic fiction. – Harper Collins Publishers. Recommended by Laurie Borchard. Location information: http://tinyurl.com/y8cgsvp7

The Girl with Seven Names: A North Korean Defector’s Story by Hyeonseo Leea girl's face

An extraordinary insight into life under one of the world’s most ruthless and secretive dictatorships – and the story of one woman’s terrifying struggle to avoid capture and guide her family to freedom. As a child growing up in North Korea, Hyeonseo Lee was one of millions trapped by a secretive and brutal communist regime. Her home on the border with China gave her some exposure to the world beyond the confines of the Hermit Kingdom and, as the famine of the 1990s struck, she began to wonder, question and to realize that she had been brainwashed her entire life. Given the repression, poverty and starvation she witnessed surely her country could not be, as she had been told “the best on the planet?” Aged seventeen, she decided to escape North Korea. She could not have imagined that it would be twelve years before she was reunited with her family. She could not return, since rumors of her escape were spreading, and she and her family could incur the punishments of the government authorities – involving imprisonment, torture, and possible public execution. Hyeonseo instead remained in China and rapidly learned Chinese in an effort to adapt and survive. Twelve years and two lifetimes later, she would return to the North Korean border in a daring mission to spirit her mother and brother to South Korea, on one of the most arduous, costly and dangerous journeys imaginable. This is the unique story not only of Hyeonseo’s escape from the darkness into the light, but also of her coming of age, education and the resolve she found to rebuild her life – not once, but twice – first in China, then in South Korea. Strong, brave and eloquent, this memoir is a triumph of her remarkable spirit. – Harper Collins Publishers. Recommended by Marcia Henry. Location information: http://tinyurl.com/y6vxzx44

The Association of Small Bombs by Karan MahajanThe Association of Small Bombs title

When brothers Tushar and Nakul Khurana, two Delhi schoolboys, pick up their family’s television set at a repair shop with their friend Mansoor Ahmed one day in 1996, disaster strikes without warning. A bomb—one of the many “small” bombs that go off seemingly unheralded across the world—detonates in the Delhi marketplace, instantly claiming the lives of the Khurana boys, to the devastation of their parents. Mansoor survives, bearing the physical and psychological effects of the bomb. After a brief stint at university in America, Mansoor returns to Delhi, where his life becomes entangled with the mysterious and charismatic Ayub, a fearless young activist whose own allegiances and beliefs are more malleable than Mansoor could imagine. Woven among the story of the Khuranas and the Ahmeds is the gripping tale of Shockie, a Kashmiri bomb maker who has forsaken his own life for the independence of his homeland. Karan Mahajan writes brilliantly about the effects of terrorism on victims and perpetrators, proving himself to be one of the most provocative and dynamic novelists of his generation. The Association of Small Bombs is a National Book Award Finalist, one of the New York Times Book Review’s Ten Best Books of the Year in addition to winning numerous other honors and awards. – Penguin Random House. Recommended by Nancy Young. Location information: http://tinyurl.com/ycwxo7pr

people rioting with the American flagGuests of the Ayatollah by Mark Bowden

On November 4, 1979, a group of radical Islamist students, inspired by revolutionary Iranian leader Ayatollah Khomeini, stormed the U.S. embassy in Tehran. They took fifty-two Americans hostage and kept nearly all of them captive 444 days.  The Iran hostage crisis was a watershed moment in American history. It was America’s first showdown with Islamic fundamentalism, a confrontation at the forefront of American policy to this day. It was also a powerful dramatic story that captivated the American people, launched yellow-ribbon campaigns, made celebrities of the hostage’s families, and crippled the reelection campaign of President Jimmy Carter.  Mark Bowden tells this sweeping story through the eyes of the hostages, their radical, naïve captors, the soldiers sent on the impossible mission to free them, and the diplomats working to end the crisis. Taking listeners from the Oval Office to the hostages’ cells, Guests of the Ayatollah is a remarkably detailed, brilliantly re-created, and suspenseful account of a crisis that gripped and ultimately changed the world. – Simon & Schuster. Recommended by Coleen Martin. Location information: http://tinyurl.com/yaysu37g

Did You Hear the News? OneSearch Is Getting a Facelift!

OneSearch Infographic

You may be asking yourself why you should care. In fact, the new OneSearch will bring several advantages to you including: an improved interface; the ability to request books easily and quickly from other CSU campuses; and longer borrowing periods.

We switch to the new OneSearch interface on June 13, 2017, and that’s when most of the changes will take effect. We will provide more information once we go live.

Before you go, take note of the following:

  • If you have “saved” records in your current OneSearch account, you will have a year to transfer them to the new system. We will help and provide instructions for you.
  • If you have any questions, you can talk to us in person or contact us online, via text, or by phone: http://library.csun.edu/ResearchAssistance/AskUs.

Susanna Eng-Ziskin

Matadors Can De-stress at the Oviatt During Finals

students writing on grafitti boardHello Matadors! Good luck with all of your finals. To help make it a stress-free experience, the Library will be providing study break activities. Today, May 15, therapy dogs visit the Library to put a smile on your face. Tomorrow, Tues., May 16, there will be guided meditation in Room 251 and on Wed., May 17 an arts & crafts session in the Library lobby. Please join us for coloring, button making and the opportunity to create your very own sculpture with Play-Doh!

Board games will be available for check out at the Guest Services Desk in the lobby all week long. Complimentary pillows and earplugs will be available to all CSUN students as well. We expect they may be useful during our extended Library hours. We want you to feel free to express yourself too. There will be a graffiti board in the Learning Commons for those who wish to share their angst about finals. Please see our study break  information for the timing of these events and for more information. We look forward to seeing you in the Library preparing for your exams and taking study breaks with us!

CSUN Student Wins National Library Week Raffle

National Library Week raffle winner

CSUN student EJ Loredo

Congratulations go to CSUN student EJ Loredo who is a Business Management major for winning the Oviatt Library National Library Week raffle! The Oviatt Library celebrated National Library Week, April 9-15, 2017. Our programming honored library staff and encouraged students to read. More than 200 students entered the raffle which asked students to name their favorite book. EJ’s favorite book is Brave New World by Aldous Huxley. The raffle was offered in conjunction with the Oviatt Library’s Favorite Books Display which featured our staff’s favorite “picks.” Students were able to browse our staff picks and check them out. Congratulations again to EJ who won a $50 gift card to Barnes & Noble!