Monthly Archives: November 2015

Local Students Find Resources at the Oviatt

NAHS students

Northridge Academy High School students

Many local students visit the Oviatt Library for tours and to find out about the resources and services available to them each year. Some classes visit the Library for instruction sessions as well. In fact, last year, 68 Library tours were provided to 1,143 local students and 37 Library lectures were provided to 1,190 local students to support them to be successful in their coursework.

Most recently, Granada Hills Charter High School (GHCHS) history classes visited the Library to find sources for a senior research project. Many of these students were not aware of the 200 databases available to them at the Oviatt Library prior to their visit. They spent time searching in the databases; evaluating information; and eventually downloading and emailing articles to themselves. Many students explored ebooks during the session. They also were able to find books in the stacks and check them out prior to completing their visit. Last year alone, 431 local high school students within the San Fernando Valley checked out Oviatt Library books for their research needs and assignments.

During their visits to the Library, these students find out about the research help they can receive from a librarian at the reference desk in the Learning Commons or virtually through our Ask A Librarian service. These visits to the Library support them to be successful in their coursework; help to prepare them for the academic rigors of university level research; and support them to acclimate to campus, as many of these students will become CSUN students after high school.

Additional local high school students will be visiting the Library next semester. We look forward to working with these students and their teachers in the coming year.

– Coleen Martin

How to Read Citations

Have you ever stared at a citation and had no idea if it was a book, chapter in a book, article or website? This infographic in our Research Therapy series breaks down citations for you, highlighting the various elements that make up a citation.

How to read a citation

Book Citations 

Elements of a book citation: author, title of book, publisher information, year. and format.

Elements of a chapter in a book citation: author of chapter, title of chapter, title of book, editor of book, publisher information, and page range of chapters.

Book Clues:

  • If the citation has publisher name and location, it’s a book!
  • In MLA citation style the format means the medium of publication.
  • E-books may have a URL, database name, or date of access at the end of the citation.

Article Citations

Elements of magazine and journal article citations: author, title of article, title of publication, volume number, issue number, year of publication, and page numbers.

Elements of a newspaper article: author, title of article, title of publication, date of publication, page number or section.

For articles found in an online library database the only difference in the citation is the addition at the end of the citation of the following; name of the database, format, access date, and sometimes the URL or DOI.

Article Clue:

  • All published articles will have two titles; the title of the article and the title of the journal/magazine/newspaper.
  • In MLA the format for an article in a library database will say “web”, but it’s not a website.
  • Magazines may just have a month of publication instead of a volume and issue number.
  • Depending on the citations style, you may see a URL or DOI for an article in an online database.

Website Citations

The elements of a website citation usually include: author/editor, title of work or page, name of the website, publisher or sponsor of website, title URL, date of publication, format, and access date.

Website Clues:

  • Websites may not provide publication dates.
  • Websites don’t always have authors, they may just list the organization that created the website.
  • Depending on the citation style, you may see the term “retrieved from” followed by a URL.

Things to Remember

  • Every citation style is different, but the elements of what makes up a citation are the same.
  • If you’re unsure of what type of article it is, just Google the name of the publication
  • You can always ask a librarian for help!

– Laurie Borchard