Monthly Archives: March 2013

Research Therapy: Need help coming up with a topic for your research paper or project?

Our new session of Research Therapy gives you ideas on where to look for topic ideas, how to narrow your topic, as well as a couple of online library resources that are a great place to begin your research. 

Topic Exploration image for video

Concept Mapping

Concept mapping is a great way to expand on a general topic; it also helps you to think about the different aspects of your topic. Here’s a template for a basic concept map. Here’s another concept map when you’re trying to identify the who, what, when, where, why or how of a topic.

As mentioned in the video keep in mind the different angles you could take on a topic:

  • Geographical → where
  • Sociological → who
  • Psychological → why
  • Historical → when

Library Databases

After you pick a general topic it’s a good idea to do some general background resources. Oviatt Library has several different online reference resources such as encyclopedias, dictionaries, biographical resources and more. The databases mentioned in the video are Opposing Viewpoints in Context and Credo Reference.  We also have a list of online reference resources listed under the Find Articles by Subject page, as well as an organized list of our databases by subject.  We also have a general Research Strategies guide to help you along with the research process.

 -Laurie Borchard        laurie.borchard@csun.edu

Please tell us what you think about our Research Therapy videos at our survey. Thank you.

NIH/NLM Grant Awarded to the Oviatt Library

The Oviatt Library has been awarded a grant by the National Institutes of Health(NIH)/National Library of Medicine (NLM). This grant helped us purchase a new database, Anatomy.TV (also known as Primal Pictures Interactive Anatomy(OVID)), a new video collection, Health and Society in Video (Alexander Press) as well as purchasing recommended electronic and print books relating to issues in women’s health, and gender differences research. The title of the grant is Women’s Health Resources and Gender Research Differences: Outreach at California State University Northridge. We are adding records in our library catalog for all items the grant purchases. In addition, the very first catalog record we provide is for the website our grant is promoting Women’s Health Resources.

women's health resources catalog record

You may also connect with the site through Women’s Health Resources in WorldCat. We will share more about our new resources provided by the grant’s funding in future blog posts.

- Marcia Henry

Research Therapy: Women’s Health Resources

The Oviatt Library has partnered with the National Library of Medicine and National Institutes of Health for this special session of Research Therapy. For more information see ‘Cited at the Oviatt’ blog post 3/6/2013.

Surely you’ve been faced with a women’s health question that needs answering—either in your own life or for a project. Of course, you should ask your doctor if you have a particular ailment that needs attention, but sometimes you want to get some preliminary information online that is free of ads and written by trustworthy health care experts. Or maybe you want to write your final paper on the emotional impact of high school bullying on lesbians, but you know Googling “lesbian teenagers” is probably not going to get you the results you need for a school paper.

So where to start? Take a look at Women’s Health Resources—an online portal to women’s health and wellness information and research funded by the National Institutes of Health. This video will give you a tour:

Research Therapy

The information and research found on Women’s Health Resources comes from a number of valuable NIH and NLM collections. Learn more below about three in particular: ClinicalTrials.gov, MedlinePlus, and PubMed.

medicine bottle

At ClinicalTrials.gov, you can see the status of clinical trials as well as data from finished studies.

What is a clinical study?  A clinical study involves research using human volunteers (also called participants) that is intended to add to medical knowledge.  There are two main types of clinical studies: clinical trials and observational studies.  ClinicalTrials.gov includes both interventional and observational studies
http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/about-studies/learn#WhatIs

Image courtesy CDC Public Health Image Library / Amanda Mills

Medline Plus image - Woman

MedlinePlus offers objective up-to-date health information in easy-to-understand language.  Get background information on diseases, conditions, wellness, drugs, treatments, and more.

 Image courtesy CDC Public Health Image Library / Amanda Mills

Graham Stain

Pubmed is a collection of citations from biomedical research in journals, books and more.  Connect to CSUN resources (so you can read the full articles) by accessing Pubmed from the Oviatt Library website.

http://library.csun.edu/xerxes/databases/database/CAL03160
Image courtesy CDC Public Health Image Library / Dr. Libero Ajello

The Oviatt Library also has plenty of women’s health material for your research needs. We offer subject databases and resource guides in both Health Sciences and Gender and Women’s Studies.

If you are using Google or another search engine to find online resources on women’s health, make sure you check out our session of Research Therapy all about website evaluation. You wouldn’t ask just anyone on the street for health information, so don’t accept it from just anywhere on the internet!

Whether it’s for yourself, a research project, or “a friend”, if you need help finding health information or Women’s Health Resources, contact the following librarians:

Lynn Lampert: lynn.lampert@csun.edu

Marcia Henry: marcia.henry@csun.edu

Anna Fidgeon: annaliese.fidgeon@csun.edu

- Anna Fidgeon

Please tell us what you think about our Research Therapy videos at our survey. Thank you.

The Science of Sex & Gender: Free Online Courses from the NIH & FDA

If you are a researcher in medical or health sciences, you probably already know that illness and treatment can have different consequences depending on a person’s gender. But maybe you want to learn more about how to incorporate gender differences into your research. Watch this video to learn more about the free online courses you can take at The Science of Sex and Gender in Human Health website, developed by the NIH and FDA.

Science of Sex and Gender

This video was funded by The National Institutes of Health/National Library of Medicine as part of the Women’s Health Resources and Gender Differences: Outreach at California State University, Northridge project. If you have questions about the grant or The Science of Sex and Gender Online Course, please contact the following librarians:

Lynn Lampert- http://library.csun.edu/llampert

Marcia Henry- http://library.csun.edu/mhenry

Anna Fidgeon- http://library.csun.edu/afidgeon

- Anna Fidgeon