Category: Uncategorized

Looking for Textbooks?

Welcome back to the Spring semester!

It’s the first week of classes and although all of your professors are expecting you to show up to the first day of classes with ALL of your textbooks, we know that’s not always the case. We also know how insanely expensive textbooks are. Don’t worry, stay calm, it will be OK, the Oviatt library can help!

This blog posts offers a list of resources that can help you find your textbooks. First, there is the library, all of our resources are free to you and there are several ways you can look for books. Second, there is the Matador bookstore, they will have all your required texts, including used books, electronic versions and even a rental program. There are also several online resources for comparing textbooks prices and renting your books. Check out the list below to learn more about how you can save money.

Library Resources

  • Course Reserves are course materials that have been set aside for your course to be checked out 2 or 4 hours at a time. Search course reserves from the library’s homepage. Check out the video below to learn more.
  • Search for current or older versions of your textbook for 2 week checkouts from the library catalog.

Purchase your textbooks

  • You can always check out the Matador Bookstore for all your textbooks.
  • DealOz compares prices against various booksellers, including Amazon, half.com, abe books, and more! This is not just for textbooks, you can search for any book.
  • ValoreBooks  is specifically for textbooks, including new, used, rentals, and alternative editions.
  • Did you know that you can buy international versions of textbooks at a discounted prices? As you search online you’ll noticed them labeled as “international” or “alternative” most of the time they are identical, sometimes paperback instead of hardcover and the ISBN might be different.

Rent your textbooks

  • Our own bookstore has a rental program, create an account & see what’s available at Follet Rentals.
  • CSU has partnered with various publishers to offer CSU students in digitial format at 60% or more off the hard copy version. Check out their Rent Digital resources.
  • BookByte-rent, buy or sell your textbooks
  • Book Renter

Good luck with your first day of classes and welcome to CSUN!

-Laurie Borchard

Reference Resources

Have you seen or heard the word reference in the library or online and wondered what that meant exactly? Check out our newest edition of Research Therapy and learn about all the different types of reference.

What is Reference?

What is Reference?

Reference Books

  • Dictionaries
  • Encyclopedias
  • Bibliographies
  • Almanacs
  • Handbooks & Manuals

Where can you find reference resources?

  • Print: Learning Commons, 1st Floor
  • Online: From the library’s homepage, click on “Databases by Subject” then click on “Reference Sources” or look for e-books in the Library Catalog

Why use a reference source?

  • Brief & introductory information on a topic
  • Good for background information and overview of topics
  • Use for facts and figures

Pro-Tip

  • More reliable than Wikipedia
  • If the book spine says REF or Learning Commons, it can’t be checked out!

Reference Desk

What is it?

  • Have a question? Librarians are waiting to talk to you. No appointment necessary!

Where is it located?

  • Learning Commons, 1st Floor, look for the wall that says: “Reference – Ask A Librarian”

Why use this service?

  • Research help
  • Develop research strategies
  • Ask questions
  • Find books and articles

Online help at library.csun.edu/AskUs via Email, Chat & Text

Reference Page

What is it?

  • Citations of the resources referred to in a paper, article, report, or book

Where is it located?

  • Found at the end of an article, chapter, or book.
  • Include References (APA) or a Works Cited (MLA) page at the end of your own papers!

Why should you create it?

  • Give credit where credit is due!

Pro-Tip: If you find an interesting article or book and want to research the topic further, look up one of the citations!

-Isabelle Ramos and Nina Mamikunian

 

 

 

Looking for your textbooks?

Hey Matadors, welcome to CSUN!

It’s the first week of classes and although all of your professors are expecting you to show up to the first day of classes with ALL of your textbooks, we know that’s not always the case. We also know how insanely expensive textbooks are. Don’t worry, stay calm, it will be OK, the Oviatt library can help!

This blog posts offers a list of resources that can help you find your textbooks. First, there is the library, all of our resources are free to you and there are several ways you can look for books. Second, there is the Matador bookstore, they will have all your required texts, including used books, electronic versions and even a rental program. There are also several online resources for comparing textbooks prices and renting your books. Check out the list below to learn more about how you can save money.

Library Resources

  • Course Reserves are course materials that have been set aside for your course to be checked out 2 or 4 hours at a time. Search course reserves from the library’s homepage. Check out the video below to learn more.
  • Search for current or older versions of your textbook for 2 week checkouts from the library catalog.

Purchase your textbooks

  • You can always check out the Matador Bookstore for all your textbooks.
  • DealOz compares prices against various booksellers, including Amazon, half.com, abe books, and more! This is not just for textbooks, you can search for any book.
  • ValoreBooks  is specifically for textbooks, including new, used, rentals, and alternative editions.
  • Did you know that you can buy international versions of textbooks at a discounted prices? As you search online you’ll noticed them labeled as “international” or “alternative” most of the time they are identical, sometimes paperback instead of hardcover and the ISBN might be different.

Rent your textbooks

  • Our own bookstore has a rental program, create an account & see what’s available at Follet Rentals.
  • CSU has partnered with various publishers to offer CSU students in digitial format at 60% or more off the hard copy version. Check out their Rent Digital resources.
  • College Book Renter

Good luck with your first day of classes and welcome to CSUN!

-Laurie Borchard

Research Therapy: Controversial Topics

Welcome back to another session of Research Therapy. This session is all about researching controversial topics.

Are vaccines safe enough? Should there be more gun control? Does government surveillance conflict with privacy?

As a student, you might be assigned a writing prompt in which you are asked to write about a controversial issue, or a “hot” topic. Once you have chosen a topic, this type of assignment requires you to include outside knowledge in addition to your own interpretation and opinion. Knowledge about your chosen topic can be found almost everywhere, but remember the different types of sources: books, newspapers or magazines, and public information on the Internet. In this tutorial, we introduce three academic databases that can help you find reliable sources for a writing assignment on a controversial issue.

Why does this matter?

As a consumer of information, it serves you to be well aware from where you’re obtaining your news—that is, what sources are you accessing to feed you information. A “hot” topic is controversial because the issue must be socially complicated, must have more than one point of view, and probably stirs debates among people with opposing opinions. Due to the controversy, the media and sources that report on the current events of a social issue have difficulty reporting information that is completely objective—that is, without a subtle bias, political beliefs, or commercial interests. Since it’s almost unrealistic for journalism and the media to report information without some degree of media bias, you should think and reflect about how accurate and fair the sources are presenting you with news. If we measure the objectivity of the source by how accurate and fair that source presents information, then we can learn about the many sides of an issue and its opposing points of view.

How do we distinguish between objective and unreliable sources?

Just because a news source is opinionated or espouses a possible agenda—like a political leaning or corporate backing—that does not mean it is unreliable. But sources that show multiple views and allow rebuttals to their own stated opinions are more likely to provide a well-rounded examination of current events and social issues. As a researcher, you should try to find those type of sources—so that even if you’re writing about your interpretation of an issue, your viewpoint will present opinions that are well supported and aware of all the other points of view.

Links to databases featured in videos:

Opposing Viewpoints in Context
Gale Virtual Reference Library
CQ Researcher

 -Mario Macias

Love My Library Week

For the month of February, libraries across the US are celebrating Love My Library Month. Here at the Oviatt we are celebrating Love My Library Week. CSUN students are our #1 priority and everything we do is because we want our students to be successful.

The following is this week’s schedule of events:

Monday: Social Media kickoff! Tell us what you love about the Oviatt using #LoveMyOviatt or #HeartOviatt. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter or Instagram and share the love!

Tuesday: Button making, noon to 2pm. Stop by our table in the front lobby of the library to make some I <3 Oviatt buttons or create your own.

Wednesday: Crafts table, noon to 2pm in front lobby. Make your Valentine a Valentine with our literary inspired cards or relax and make some origami flowers.  Tell us in writing what you love about us by stopping by our board of hearts on the first floor of the library.

Thursday & Friday: Blind Date with a Book. Stop by our book cart on the first floor of the library and take a chance with a book that’s all wrapped up. Don’t worry we’ll give you clues to what’s inside.

We will be sharing photos and comments on social media all throughout the week.

-Laurie Borchard

Research Therapy: The Info-Cycle

In Session 12 of Research Therapy, we learned ways to identify different types of information. So how do you decide what information is best for you to use? Let’s take a quick (and grossly oversimplified) look at the Cycle of Information:

Of course, there are going to be outliers and other types of information that might work for you (diaries! letters! art! oh my!), but the two most important things to remember are: 1.) follow your professor’s assignment requirements and 2.) be critical: know the who, what, when, where, how, and why of your resource. Our session on Evaluating Websites can be applied to any resource.

Be sure to check out #researchRx on Twitter for a quick fix on research tips!

Good luck on those long research papers! If you need help, don’t forget you can Ask a Librarian.

– Anna Fidgeon

Research Therapy: Women’s Health Resources

The Oviatt Library has partnered with the National Library of Medicine and National Institutes of Health for this special session of Research Therapy. For more information see ‘Cited at the Oviatt’ blog post 3/6/2013.

Surely you’ve been faced with a women’s health question that needs answering—either in your own life or for a project. Of course, you should ask your doctor if you have a particular ailment that needs attention, but sometimes you want to get some preliminary information online that is free of ads and written by trustworthy health care experts. Or maybe you want to write your final paper on the emotional impact of high school bullying on lesbians, but you know Googling “lesbian teenagers” is probably not going to get you the results you need for a school paper.

So where to start? Take a look at Women’s Health Resources—an online portal to women’s health and wellness information and research funded by the National Institutes of Health. This video will give you a tour:

Research Therapy

The information and research found on Women’s Health Resources comes from a number of valuable NIH and NLM collections. Learn more below about three in particular: ClinicalTrials.gov, MedlinePlus, and PubMed.

medicine bottle

At ClinicalTrials.gov, you can see the status of clinical trials as well as data from finished studies.

What is a clinical study?  A clinical study involves research using human volunteers (also called participants) that is intended to add to medical knowledge.  There are two main types of clinical studies: clinical trials and observational studies.  ClinicalTrials.gov includes both interventional and observational studies
http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/about-studies/learn#WhatIs

Image courtesy CDC Public Health Image Library / Amanda Mills

Medline Plus image - Woman

MedlinePlus offers objective up-to-date health information in easy-to-understand language.  Get background information on diseases, conditions, wellness, drugs, treatments, and more.

Image courtesy CDC Public Health Image Library / Amanda Mills

Graham Stain

Pubmed is a collection of citations from biomedical research in journals, books and more.  Connect to CSUN resources (so you can read the full articles) by accessing Pubmed from the Oviatt Library website.

http://library.csun.edu/xerxes/databases/database/CAL03160
Image courtesy CDC Public Health Image Library / Dr. Libero Ajello

The Oviatt Library also has plenty of women’s health material for your research needs. We offer subject databases and resource guides in both Health Sciences and Gender and Women’s Studies.

If you are using Google or another search engine to find online resources on women’s health, make sure you check out our session of Research Therapy all about website evaluation. You wouldn’t ask just anyone on the street for health information, so don’t accept it from just anywhere on the internet!

Whether it’s for yourself, a research project, or “a friend”, if you need help finding health information or Women’s Health Resources, contact the following librarians:

Lynn Lampert: lynn.lampert@csun.edu

Marcia Henry: marcia.henry@csun.edu

Anna Fidgeon: annaliese.fidgeon@csun.edu

– Anna Fidgeon

Please tell us what you think about our Research Therapy videos at our survey. Thank you.