The Oviatt’s New Discovery Tool OneSearch Is Here

OneSearch ImageYou may have noticed the Library’s new website design. We are excited about its modern look and the way it streamlines finding Library information and resources. One of the new aspects of the website is OneSearch, our new resource discovery tool that searches all of the Library’s subject areas at once. Yes, I said at once. That means when you enter your search terms into the OneSearch search box you will be searching more than one million books, media, and approximately 150 databases. The beauty of this discovery tool is you can narrow your results using custom designed facets. In layman’s terms, that means you can narrow your results to sort through the scholarly articles, full-text records, book reviews and more. Results can be narrowed to specific date ranges, books or journal titles. Searches can be made for authors and subjects as well. For those of you who like to know how the tool ‘runs under the hood,’ all of the Oviatt databases have been pre-indexed by OneSearch and you as a researcher search its index. Because it is a unified index the results are much more consistent than multi-search tools that simply search several databases at once. We invite you to give it a try!

- Coleen Martin

The Oviatt Helps CSUN Shine Brighter at this Year’s Faculty Retreat

CSUN flag

CSUN flag by alumnus Michael O'Meara

The Oviatt Library is looking forward to this year’s CSUN Faculty Retreat “Illuminating Pathways to Success” which will be held on campus January 14 and 15. Faculty members will have the opportunity to attend presentations and workshops to support an active start to the New Year and semester. The Oviatt is pleased to host several sessions at the event in order to share relevant resources and services with faculty members in an effort to meet the needs of specific classes as well as their research.

 The presentation “Scholar Spotlight: The Path to Open Access” presented by Andrew Weiss and Elizabeth Altman will focus on Scholar Spotlight, an ongoing program to gather and digitally preserve the scholarship and creative works of CSUN faculty and staff. Andrew and Elizabeth will demonstrate the impact the initial pilot for the program has had on those who participated. They will also focus on how ScholarWorks, CSUN’s institutional repository, can function as the heart of sustainable access and digital preservation through open-access (OA) journal publication. OA is currently mandated by the National Science Foundation (NSF) and other Federal grant funders but could also help the Library and CSUN reduce costs significantly. Finally, they will explain how all faculty can participate in and benefit from the open access movement.

 Also not to miss are three Oviatt Library poster sessions Moving Online? Let the Library Come with You presented by Anna Fidgeon, Laurie Borchard and Danielle Skaggs; EndNote Web for Students – KIN 200: Foundations of Kinesiology Experiences Information Management to Improve Research and Citing Skills presented by Marcia Henry, Nick Galli and Erica Cosby; and Digital Darwinism: A Brief Survival Guide to Personal Information Management presented by Stephen Kutay. For more information and presentation times see the Faculty Retreat Program. Hope to see you there!

- Coleen Martin

Oviatt Library Offers EndNote Web, a Personal Citation Management Database

It’s getting very close to the holidays. I am the Health Sciences Librarian here at Oviatt Library and I want to present you with a special gift which can help you organize your information on the literature you are reading for your classes. It can help you cite scholarly articles,  newspapers, magazine articles, videos, books, book chapters and websites you find to do your assignments.  It allows you to share your collected references with your fellow students and professors if they too have signed up for their own free EndNote Web account. The best way to share this information on EndNote Web is to direct you to our EndNoteWeb video tutorials

EndNote Web

Today I am briefly describing how EndNote Web will work with our EbscoHost databases which has indexes, abstracts and full-text for just about all academic departments in this University.  There is an easy to use Export button. Select the bibliographic information you want to send to EndNote Web and select the Export button.

Cinahl example for Endnote

If you have not already logged into your EndNote Web account, a log in screen will appear, and the information in the EbscoHost database should prompt EndNote Web to open an appropriate template identifying what type of publication, the example here, a book chapter, and populate the fields with the necessary information. 

Endnote Web

The important thing to understand about EndNote Web is that it is your personal database and you can edit information as necessary.  You do NOT want to rely on the Library databases to export with 100% accuracy. EndNote web  is a big help in capturing  a lot of essential information with links back to the article for you to resume your research.  Take time to check your information before writing your paper and make needed corrections. Then you can get a lot of help for different style guides for all disciplines, APA 6th, MLA, Chicago, JAMA, American Sociological Association and dozens more through EndNote Web.  

The Library public computer stations  have the  EndNote Web Cite While You Write plug in which will help you with in-text citing as well as the list of references in the style you select.

endnote web

i.e. Will insert in-text citation and the full reference in order required by the style you asked it to do (Gill & Kamphoff, 2010)

But always remember to double-check the accuracy of the citations EndNote Web generates. While it can help you to organize your research materials and citations, it is not always accurate. Of course, if you have questions, please visit us at the reference desk!

- Marcia Henry

Reference Services: What can we do for you?

librarian with glasses and books

Image courtesy of Stuart Miles/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

As we head into the last few weeks of the Fall semester, many CSUN students will undoubtedly be working on final assignments and papers. Those papers often require the use of outside resources, which may include newspaper and magazine articles, books, scholarly/academic journal articles, films, and interviews, among others.

If you’re trying to find research for your topic, but are coming up empty, don’t forget to ask for help! A good rule of thumb is that if you’ve been searching for a solid 30 minutes and are stuck, that’s a really good time to stop and reevaluate what you’re doing. A librarian can help you narrow your topic, guide you towards the best resources for your assignment, and show you where to find guides for your citations. You can get help in the following ways.

 The Reference Desk: Your best bet is to come to the Oviatt, if you can, and talk to a librarian in person at the Reference Desk. Just walk through the lobby and past the coffee cart, and you’re right there in the Reference Room. You’ll see a big wooden desk, and there will be 1 or 2 librarians sitting there, waiting for you and your research questions. It’s staffed most of the hours that the library is open. You can also call and talk to someone at the Reference Desk – (818) 677-2285

Make an appointment with a Librarian: Did you know that we have Librarians who work with specific majors and fields? You can make an appointment with your subject area Librarian for a lengthier consultation than you can get at the Reference Desk. Don’t know who your librarian is? Try this page: http://library.csun.edu/About/SubjectSpecialists. Because we’re not always sitting in our offices, you’ll probably have better luck setting up an appointment with us by email, rather than by phone.

girl on cell phone

Image courtesy of imagerymajestic/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Text A Librarian: Store this number in your contacts, and the next time you have a quick question, just text it to us: (818) 900-2965.

Ask Us!: You can also access our LibAnswers FAQ. Just type in your question at the top of the page in the “Ask Us Anything” box. If it matches a question in our FAQ we’ll direct you to the answer. If it’s not in our FAQ, we’ll redirect you to a form where you can email us your question. We’ll get back to you with an answer as soon as possible. Often, during the week, we respond within an hour, if not 15 minutes.

Live Chat: We know that students often do their research at times when the Library is closed, and we are unable to answer any questions. But you can log into our QuestionPoint Live Chat service 24/7, 365 days a year. No webcams are needed – unlike FaceTime or Skype, this chat service is done strictly through the keyboard. You won’t usually be chatting with a CSUN librarian, but they will know you’re a CSUN student and which databases and resources you have access to.

Research Therapy: Check out our series of short videos explaining different aspects of the research process – it’s Research Therapy! Finally, you can see all your options for getting in touch with a Reference Librarian on our Ask A Librarian page.

Good luck with your final projects and papers! Hope to see you at the Reference Desk!

- Susanna Eng-Ziskin

Watch Stage Performance Videos with Two New Databases

Theatre on Video

The Critic, by Richard Brinsley Sheridan, directed by Don Taylor, performed by Sir John Gielgud, Nigel Hawthorne & Rosemary Leach

‘Talking about music is like dancing about architecture’ may be one of the most common adages acknowledging the value of experiencing art for interpretation. For many, witnessing a performance is key to seeing how everything fits together. While reading a play is one level of understanding a work, this may not be enough to support mastery of the craft. But seeing a piece unfold can be instrumental in discovering its multiple layers and sometimes this requires viewing many different performances of the same work. Two of the Oviatt Library’s latest resources, which have been funded by the Campus Quality Fee, make experiencing Opera and Theatre performances much more accessible. Students, staff and faculty can now log in to Library resources through Databases A-Z to find them. While some performances may be found on YouTube, the quality of the videos in these databases is generally higher and includes permission to cite them as academic sources. In addition to viewing the performances directly from the databases, these videos can also be shared with classes through Moodle. So put your dancing shoes aside as the adage suggests and enjoy the convenience of Opera and Theatre performances directly from your computer. 

Opera in Video - Collection of the most important opera performances, captured on video through staged productions, interviews, and documentaries. Selections represent the world’s best performers, conductors, and opera houses and are based on a work’s importance to the operatic canon.

 Theatre in Video - Collection of more than 250 definitive performances of the world’s leading plays, together with more than 100 film documentaries, online in streaming video, representing hundreds of leading playwrights, actors and directors.

- Coleen Martin and Lindsay Hansen

Spend Some Time this Thanksgiving with Oviatt Resources

Thanksgiving

Faith Goble 2010

Happy Thanksgiving, Matadors! The Oviatt Library will be closed this Thursday and Friday in honor of the holiday, so check out some books and movies to enjoy over the long weekend. If you’ll be travelling and want some distractions, browse the best sellers collection in the reference room for the latest mysteries, romance, and other fun fiction.

Thanksgiving is all about tradition.  Read about its history of the holiday in Thanksgiving: The Biography of an American Holiday (GT4975 .B33 2009) and Mayflower: A Story of Courage, Community, and War (F68 .P44 2006).  Both books are available for check out on the second floor.

For the traditional feast, try the ebook Take Control of Thanksgiving Dinner. It has all the basic recipes plus vegetarian alternatives, and solutions to last minute crises. Great for first-time chefs.

 If you’re dreading the big family gathering, watch Ang Lee’s film The Ice Storm (PN1997 .I347 2008 in the Music & Media library).  The all-star cast’s depiction of family dissolution during Thanksgiving 1973 might resonate.

 We’ll reopen at 11AM on Saturday.  Enjoy the break!

 - Laura Wimberley

Research Therapy: Citing Your Sources

The sixth installment of Research Therapy gives you a brief overview of why you need to cite, when you should cite and how you should cite.

Do you have a research paper or project coming up and your instructor wants a specific number of sources? Knowing when and how to cite your sources can be a little confusing. The most important thing that you need to know is that you need to cite anything you use that doesn’t originate from you. Not only should you do this when you’re writing a paper or working on a research project, but also when creating a presentation or a website. You should cite tweets, blog posts, images, podcasts, and YouTube videos, basically anything you use that you did not create yourself.

citing image

Citation Styles
Different academic disciplines have different citation styles, it’s important that you know what style your instructor wants you to use. Here’s some examples of the different styles.

citation chart

Citing Special Resources?
Here’s a list of resources and guides for citing less common sources.
Government Documents
Business Resources : a comprehensive guide from Harvard Business School on citing various types of sources, including reports, interviews, and legal cases (just to name a few).
• This guide from Boise State gives examples of citing images, Twitter, Facebook, blog posts, maps, and videos.

Need More Help?
For additional help on creating citations using various styles check out Oviatt Library’s Citing Your Sources guide. For a quick how-to on creating an annotated bibliography, check out session three of the Research Therapy video series.
Still confused, about plagiarism? Check out this online tutorial created by UCLA students.

-Laurie Borchard

laurie.borchard@csun.edu

Please tell us what you think about our Research Therapy videos at our survey. Thank you.

The Teacher Curriculum Center: The Best Kept Secret – and It’s Not Just for Teachers!

Teacher Curriculum Center (TCC)Come to the Teacher Curriculum Center (TCC)! While the department’s name may sound intellectual and stuffy, it is actually a friendly place- and space –for all students to research, study, and create. It is an open work area for aspiring teachers, future business bigwigs, or perhaps a mechanical engineer.

Among its many offerings, the TCC houses materials for those working with children, grades K-12. Its collection includes a variety of items: instructional kits, games, CDs. DVDs, puppets and lesson plans. It also features a collection of over 5,000 children’s and young adult books. If you are looking for Rainbow Fish, Hop on Pop, Harry Potter, or The Hunger Games, they are all available for check out.

But wait, there is more! Many are not aware that the TCC is a fantastic multi-use area that allows for individual or group study, bulletin board construction, and poster presentation creation. It has a die-cut machine which can be used to cut out letters, numbers, animals, and geometric shapes to add spark to your artistic designs. The three large white boards can be used for a wide variety of purposes: working out mathematical formulas or diagramming flowcharts. Students needing to practice the dance steps for their Children’s Music class can do so in the TCC. Need to rehearse your speech for your public speaking course? The TCC is the place for you.

The TCC is located on the Garden Level of the Oviatt library (enter through the library’s main entrance). Come and check it out!

- Mara Houdyshell

Research Therapy: What is a Scholarly Article?

Have you ever wondered exactly what is a scholarly article? And how can you tell if an article you’ve found is scholarly? Watch the following short video and read the information below to answer these questions and more!

Why Can’t I Find Scholarly Sources on My Topic?
If you’re having trouble finding scholarly sources on your topic, you may be running into one of these problems:
Not enough time has passed: it takes time to conduct research, write the scholarly article, and then get it published. If your topic concerns an event that happened recently (in the last year for example), there may not be anything scholarly published on it yet. The Fix: find scholarly articles on broader themes related to your topic. For example, if you wanted to write about the 2012 presidential election, you could find scholarly articles on past presidential elections dealing with aspects that relate to the current election.
Need to try another database: you may be looking in a database that doesn’t have many scholarly articles, or it may not have many articles from the subject area your topic falls in. The Fix: try using a subject-specific database or one of the other resources in the Finding Scholarly Articles section below.
The topic hasn’t been researched: since scholarly articles are the results of research being done by professors and other experts in the field, there may not be scholarly articles on your topic if someone hasn’t yet undertaken the research, found an angle of interest to the field, or found a measurable way to test it. The Fix: find scholarly articles on broader themes related to your topic. For example, if you need a scholarly article for your speech on how to tie a tie, you probably won’t find scholarly articles explaining how to tie a tie, but you may find articles on how men’s neckwear has evolved through history.
Can Books be Scholarly?
Usually when we talk about scholarly sources, we’re talking about scholarly articles. However, books can be scholarly as well. One factor to look at for books is the publisher. Books from university presses (such as University of California Press or Harvard University Press) are more likely to be scholarly, but you should also check that there are references cited in the text and listed at the end and that the language of the book is scholarly.
Is It Peer-Reviewed?
Many scholarly articles are peer-reviewed, which is when the journal’s editor has other researchers in the field review the article before it is published. They evaluate the content and procedures used and recommend whether the article should be published as is, revised, or rejected. Peer-reviewed journals are also known as refereed journals.
To check if the article is peer-reviewed, you can
• Check the About or Focus/Scope section of the journal’s webpage. Many journals will say if they are peer-reviewed on these pages.
• Look the journal up in Ulrich’s to see if it is peer-reviewed. For more information on how to do this, watch the Is This Journal Peer Reviewed? tutorial.
Finding Scholarly Articles
To find scholarly articles, try:
JSTOR or Project Muse, which consist entirely of articles from scholarly journals. JSTOR covers most disciplines while Project Muse focuses on humanities, arts, and social sciences.
• Selecting the Scholarly or Peer Reviewed check box available in many general and subject-specific databases, such as General OneFile or PsycInfo.
• Using Google Scholar instead of Google. You can set up Google Scholar so you can access CSUN resources from off campus.

- Danielle Skaggs

Please tell us what you think about our Research Therapy videos at our survey. Thank you.

Research Therapy: Be a Search Boss

We admit it. Searching a library catalog or database is not always as straightforward as Google. And sometimes, searching Google is frustrating because you get so many questionable results. So how can you find that really great article for your paper? This video will show you some tactics to help get you on your way to being a Super Searcher!

I’m finding too much! I can’t find enough!
If you are overloaded or underloaded with search results, you might want to rethink your search strategy by brainstorming broader or narrower concepts. For example, if your topic for a 5-page paper is gay rights, do you think you could cover everything ever about gay rights in so few pages? If so, you should give me some writing lessons.

searchstrategy image gay marriage
Most likely, with a topic as broad as gay rights, you probably want to focus on something a little more narrow under the umbrella of gay rights, such as gay marriage. If you still feel like there’s still too much on your topic to cover, you might focus in even more. For example, you could specifically look at Prop 8.

Question your assignment
One way to think about your topic is to form it into a question you can answer with your research. This can also help you focus your topic. Here are some examples:

searchstrategy image ask yourself

It might seem frustrating when you have to keep adjusting your search, but that’s exactly what research is, it’s re-searching until you find what you’re looking for. If you feel really stuck, be sure to Ask A Librarian for help.

- Anna Fidgeon

annaliese.fidgeon@csun.edu

Please tell us what you think about our Research Therapy videos at our survey. Thank you.